Call for Papers - Locale

Call for Papers - Locale

Dear Colleagues,

I would like to alert you to the journal Locale: The Pacific Journal of Regional Food Studies (http://www.localejournal.org/). The journal has recently expanded its geographical focus from Austral-Asia to the Pacific more broadly (including the Pacific rim): It is published out of the Institute for Community Engaged Research at UBC Okanagan (which is emerging out of the previous Centre for Social, Spatial, and Economic Justice), and the Regional Food Network at Southern Cross University. Please have a look if you have some time. It is an open access, fully peer reviewed journal. For folks in the Antipodes - this is an ERA listed journal. If you have an article that you think appropriate to submit to the journal (we DO NOT have any publication fees or the like!), I would love to hear from you. We are working on a special issue now, entitled "Indigenous Foods and Contemporary Cuisines", and would especially like to invite papers that speak to that general theme.

Best Regards

Mike

Mike Evans PhD
Professor | Community, Culture & Global Studies | Irving K. Barber School of Arts & Sciences
Interim Director | Institute for Community Engaged Research
The University of British Columbia | Okanagan Campus
Arts 368c - 1147 Research Rd. Kelowna, BC Canada V1V 1V7
Phone 250 807 9401
mike.evans@ubc.ca
http://ccgs.ok.ubc.ca/faculty/evans.html

CfP: IV Congreso Latinoamericano de Antropología - Mexico City, October 2015

Call for Papers

Deadline: April 30, 2015.

We invite anthropologists and colleagues to present paper proposals at IV
Congreso Latinoamericano de Antropología
that will take place October 7-10,
2015 in downtown Mexico City.

People interested in presenting a paper can ask to add his proposal to one
of the ACCEPTED PANELS (List One
,
List Two
)
or they can ask for a complete list writing to: congresoala2015@gmail.com.

To propose a paper, please fill this FORM
,
where we ask for title, abstract, and name and number of the panel in in
which you want to participate, in case your paper is not already accepted
in any panel. Also, we ask for personal information: name, institution,
academic degree and e-mail. You can also ask for a paper proposal file if
you write to congresoala2015@gmail.com.

Deadline: April 30, 2015.

Thank you for participating.

Sincerely,

Asociación Latinoamericana de Antropología (#ALAmx2015)

Dra. Cristina Oehmichen - Presidenta

Dra. Milka Castro - Vicepresidenta

Dra. Laura Valladares - Secretaria General

Antrop. María Antonieta Gallart – Tesorera

IV Congreso Latinoamericano de Antropología

Instituto de Investigaciones Antropológicas

Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México

www.ala.iia.unam.mx

CFP: Association for Critical Heritage Studies

What Does Heritage Change? Association for Critical Heritage Studies

The Canada Research Chair in Urban Heritage at the Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM) , in partnership with the Centre for Oral History and Digital Storytelling and Concordia University, is hosting the third biannual conference of the Association of Critical Heritage Studies from June 7-10, 2016 in Montreal, Québec. You are invited to submit session proposals by July 1st (individual paper proposals are due November 1st), for more information visit www.achs2016.uqam.ca

Submissions to the 2016 ACHS Conference should bring innovative reflections and interdisciplinary methodologies or approaches to the critical enquiries about how and why heritage is, has been or could be made, used, studied, defined and managed, and with what effects, if any, on a society, a territory, an economy. Contributions might, for example, explore the reconstruction of narratives, the reconfiguration of social relations, knowledge production and cultural expressions, the transformation of the environment or the (de)valuation of the land. We particularly welcome papers that go beyond canon theories to interrogate discipline-based norms about heritage, and the assumptions that orient practice or decision-making. In this respect, this conference aims to continue important debates about heritage as a domain of politics and citizenship, a living environment, a source of identity and an assemblage of human-non-human relations.

As the conference wishes to expand boundaries of critical heritage studies, through research-creation or other means, it will welcome non-traditional proposals dedicated to the development of knowledge and innovation through artistic or multimedia expression and experimentation. Proposals may be submitted in French or English.

Lucie Morisset
Département d’études urbaines et touristiques
Case postale 8888, succursale centre-ville
Montréal (Québec) H3C 3P8
Téléphone : 514 987-3000, poste 2562
Télécopieur : 514 987-6881
Email: achs2016@uqam.ca
Visit the website at http://www.achs2016.uqam.ca

CFP: ETNOFOOR: Anthropological Journal on Security

ETNOFOOR: Anthropological Journal on Security
Deadline: May 1, 2015
http://etnofoor.nl/?page_id=30

 

CFP: Multi- and Inter-disciplinary International Conference on ‘From the Thirty Years’ Crisis to Multi-polarity: The Evolution of the Geopolitical Economy of the 21st Century World’ - University of Manitoba, September 2015

Call for Papers
for a Multi- and Inter-disciplinary International Conference on
‘From the Thirty Years’ Crisis to Multi-polarity:
The Evolution of the Geopolitical Economy of the
21st Century World’
at the University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada
25-27 September 2015

The centenary of the outbreak of the First World War was marked in Canada and around the world in 2014. 2014 also marked the centenary of the opening of what noted historian, Arno Mayer, called the ‘Thirty Years’ Crisis’ of 1914-1945, spanning the First World War, the Great Depression and the Second World War. This long crisis birthed a new world. The old world of the nineteenth century expansion of the empires of industrial capitalist countries, often mistakenly termed ‘liberal’, met its end. It gave way to an inter-national one populated by a variety of welfare, Communist and developmental orders in national economies whose states had, moreover, greater legitimacy among newly enfranchised women and men than the imperial and colonial regimes they replaced. The Thirty Years crisis also radically redistributed economic, political, military and cultural power within countries and among them. Critical cultural and intellectual changes – new movements in art, new media, and new paradigms of understanding, particularly in economics, inevitably accompanied these historic shifts.

As we stand at the cusp of another wave of complex changes to the world order, this time towards multi-polarity, our conference aims to understand the major changes of the past century better than hitherto dominant paradigms, such as neo-classical economics, globalization and empire, have so far done and to bring that re-assessment to bear on how best to understand problems of and prospects for the world order of the 21st century.

We invite submissions for papers, panels and steams of panels relevant to any aspect of the overarching conference theme from scholars across the humanities, social sciences and in inter-disciplinary studies based in Canada and around the world. Heterodox and critical scholarship is particularly encouraged. A preliminary and non-exhaustive list of themes includes:

1. Science, Technology and Society in War and Peace
2. Production and Prosperity in Capitalisms and ‘Communisms’
3. Continuity and Change in Economic Thought: Keynes and beyond
4. Gender: Economy, War, and Politics
5. Colonization, Independence, Sovereignty, Indigeneity.
6. Multipolarities Old and New: 1914, 2014 and beyond
7. World Monetary and Financial (Dis)Orders: sterling standard, dollar standard and beyond
8. The Matter of Nature: Extractive Economies, Environmental Governance and Sustainability
9. Canada: Nations, Identities and Economies
10. Art, Politics and Practices of Power: Beyond Westernization

The conference will inaugurate the Geopolitical Economy Research Group at the University of Manitoba and will bring together scholars connected with its network of supporting research centres and academic departments the world over.

Abstracts should be 300 to 400 words. They should be single spaced and use 12 point Times New Roman font. They should include the author or authors’ full name, affiliation, a brief biography, and e-mail address. We ask they be sent by May 15, 2015 to contact@gergconference.ca

Revue Diversité urbaine: Call for papers

Please find below a call for paper for our upcoming issue of the journal Diversité urbaine.

Diversité urbaine, directed by Deirdre Meintel, focuses on ethnicity, ethnic relations and immigration, religious diversity and social dynamics in Quebec and elsewhere in the world.

We would appreciate your assistance in circulating this information.
Please do not hesitate to contact us for any question.

Sincerely,

Akané D'Orangeville, coordinator
Deirdre Meintel, director

Revue Diversité urbaine
http://www.grdu.umontreal.ca/

-

Diversité urbaine

CALL FOR PAPERS
Deadline: May 15th, 2015*

Since 2000, the Groupe de recherche diversité urbaine has published a journal that offers junior as well as experienced researchers the opportunity to publish work based on empirical research. Diversité urbaine focuses on ethnicity and ethnic relations, immigration, religious diversity and social dynamics in Quebec and elsewhere in the world. The journal’s presence on the Érudit website ensures its international visibility (www.erudit.org/revue/du).

Evaluation process
The journal considers only manuscripts that have not been published or submitted for publication elsewhere. Manuscripts accepted for the evaluation process are read by two external specialists. They must then be revised by the authors, in line with the comments given by the evaluators. The Diversité urbaine team reserves the right to make minor stylistic corrections.

Presentation of manuscripts

· We publish mainly articles in French, except for occasional contributions in English. (If you wish to submit your article in English, please advise ur in advance by sending us an e-mail.)

· Articles or research notes should be between 4500 and 6000 words, excluding the bibliography.

· The author should include, in both French and English, a biographical note (40 words maximum), a summary (125 words maximum) as well as five key words.

· Please refer to our submission guidelines for further details:

www.grdu.umontreal.ca/en/publications.html

The Diversité urbaine team

Directors: Deirdre Meintel

Editors: Josiane LeGall and Géraldine Mossière

Assistant editor: Marie-Jeanne Blain

Editorial assistant: Fabien Maillé-Paulin

Coordination: Akané D’Orangeville

International editorial board:

Paul Eid, Myriam Hachimi, Marie-Claude Haince, Sylvie Fortin, Patricia Lamarre, Ignace Olazabal, Martha Radice, Bruno Ramirez, Christian Rinaudo, Victor Piché, Fernanda Claudio et Emmanuelle Santelli.

*Texts can be submitted electronically at any time, to the attention of Akané D’Orangeville.

E-mail : grdu@umontreal.ca<mailto:grdu@umontreal.ca>

Website: www.grdu.umontreal.ca/en/publications.html

Indigenizing Pilgrimage Conference - May 7-10, 2015 – Concordia University

Upcoming Conference - Indigenizing Pilgrimage:growing, identifying & localizing transformative journeys - May 2015 – Concordia University
May 7-10, 2015

Concordia University

Join us for an international, multidisciplinary conference "Indigenizing Pilgrimage: growing, identifying & localizing transformative journeys" May 7-10, 2015 – Concordia University

Montréal, Québec, Canada

Keynote speakers: Simon Coleman is Chancellor Jackman Professor, Department for the Study of Religion, University of Toronto. He is co-editor of the journal Religion and Society, and of the Ashgate Studies in Pilgrimage book series.

Raymond Aldred is Assistant Professor of Theology, Ambrose University (Calgary), and works with My People International. He is former Director for the First Nations Alliance Churches of Canada. He is status Cree.

Conference schedule

Thursday, May 7 Sir George Williams (downtown) campus (room TBA)
6:00-6:30pm Registration: Indigenizing Pilgrimage Conference
7:00-9:00pm Film/Q&A: Screening of Dakota 38 (on the 330-mile horseback pilgrimage of reconciliation from Lower Brule, South Dakota to Mankato, Minnesota in memory of thirty- eight Dakota Sioux hanged in 1862, the largest mass-execution in US history). The screening will be followed by panel Q&A

Friday, May 8 Loyola campus (rooms TBA)
10:00-10:30am Welcome to Student Conference “Pilgrimage: Sacred Journeys”; WITW special Issue Launch
10:30-12:00pm Students’ Morning Paper/Presentation Session
12:00-1:00pm Lunch break (list of recommended restaurants & cafes provided)
1:00-2:00pm Coffee & Art Break (pilgrimage art, poetry, performance/presentations)
2:00-2:30pm Conversation with Artist in Residence: Sawsan Al Saraf, multimedia artist and pilgrim
2:30-4:00pm Students’ Afternoon Paper/Presentation Session
4:00-6:00pm Free time (list of recommended restaurants & cafes provided)
6:00-6:30pm Registration
6:30-6:45pm Indigenizing Pilgrimage Conference Opening & Welcome
6:45-7:30pm Film/Q&A: Screening of Under the North Star (diaspora pilgrimage and the concept of home), followed by Q&A with film-maker, Dr. Matthew Anderson.
7:30-8:30pm Opening Keynote address: Dr. Simon Coleman, University of Toronto
8:30-10:00pm Wine & Cheese Reception

Saturday, May 9 Sir George Williams (downtown) campus (rooms TBA)
9:00am Coffee and Registration: Indigenizing Pilgrimage Conference
9:30-10:00am Welcome Ceremony (Aboriginal tradition in Canadian context)
10:00-11:30am Morning Paper/Presentation Sessions 1.1; 1.2; 1.3
11:30am-1:00pm Lunch break (list of recommended restaurants & cafes provided)
1:00-2:30pm Afternoon Paper/Presentation Sessions 2.1; 2.2; 2.3
2:30-3:00pm Coffee Break
3:00-4:00pm Closing keynote address, Prof. Raymond Aldred, Ambrose University, Calgary
7:00 pm Conference Banquet ($45 taxes & tip included; cash bar)

Sunday, May 10
1:00-2:30pm Optional tour of the pilgrim chapel of Notre-Dame-de-Bon-Secours Located in historic Vieux-Montréal (Old Montreal) , the Chapelle has been a pilgrimage site since the 17th century. Includes Museum visit. Cost: $15.00 FYI: Chapelle website : http://www.marguerite-bourgeoys.com/en/

You can find more information about the programme, venues, accommodations, etc. at:

http://www.concordia.ca/artsci/theology/news/indigenizing-pilgrimage.html

 

Hétérogénéité et changements : perspectives sociolinguistiques - Grenoble, June 2015

HÉTÉROGÉNÉITÉ ET CHANGEMENT, RFS 2015, GRENOBLE 10-12 JUIN

Hétérogénéité et changements : perspectives sociolinguistiques

Le Réseau francophone de sociolinguistique rassemble des chercheurs autour de différents objets d’étude, et qui adoptent des perspectives théoriques et méthodologiques également diverses, reflétant les ancrages épistémologiques contrastés qui ont peu à peu structuré le champ de la sociolinguistique. La volonté collective d’appréhender le langage en société a en effet ouvert un large éventail de positionnements et de programmes de recherche. Au-delà des divergences de vues, c’est cette volonté commune de concevoir et pratiquer la linguistique comme une science humaine et sociale qui a donné lieu aux travaux sur la communication verbale in vivo, sur les interactions interpersonnelles, ainsi qu’à l’étude de la variation intra- et inter-linguistique et, plus récemment, à la prise en compte des contextes socio-historiques de production des discours.

Le déplacement des regards du système linguistique vers la communication, verbale et non verbale, ainsi qu’en direction de l’organisation des discours, avec une prise en compte de la dimension anthropologique ou culturelle, a placé sur le devant de la scène les notions d’hétérogénéité et de changement, envisagées non plus comme des évènements historiques entre des états stables mais comme étant au cœur même des activités langagières en général.
Ainsi, décrire, comprendre, expliquer ou modéliser les changements linguistiques et l'hétérogénéité des usages et des pratiques sont des tâches qui font partie du « cœur de métier » des sociolinguistes. Ces activités sont centrales pour les chercheur.e.s qui s’attellent aujourd'hui à décrire et analyser les versants sociolangagiers de phénomènes aussi divers que la globalisation des échanges, la marchandisation des langues, les migrations transnationales, les mutations socio-spatiales, les rapports de genre, la transformation des espaces de travail, etc., en accordant de l’importance aux phénomènes discursifs dans la construction de la réalité sociale et en cherchant à saisir les significations sociales des pratiques langagières.

Ce sont autant de raisons pour lesquelles le comité d’organisation a choisi de mettre en avant les notions d'hétérogénéité et changement pour l’édition 2015 du congrès RFS, qu'il organise autour d’une préoccupation commune : accorder la priorité aux interactions et aux influences réciproques entre processus sociaux, voire sociohistoriques, et faits langagiers, et ce quelles que soient les méthodes ou approches envisagées.

http://rfs2015.u-grenoble3.fr/

 

CALL FOR PARTICIPATION – BLURRED LINES: WORKING SYMMETRICALLY IN ANTHROPOLOGY AND ARCHAEOLOGY WORKSHOP - Frankfurt, June 2015

CALL FOR PARTICIPATION – BLURRED LINES: WORKING SYMMETRICALLY IN ANTHROPOLOGY AND ARCHAEOLOGY WORKSHOP

Workshop in Frankfurt, June 12-14, 2015.

For researchers in anthropology and archaeology, the seemingly provocative agenda of Tim Ingold’s trailblazing headline “No more Ancient; No more Human. The Future Past of Archaeology and Anthropology” might evoke enthusiasm and frustration alike. The enthusiasm-reflex, relying on an unquestioned assumption that it is possible to “finally get things right”, originates in the promising prospects of leaving the beaten path built on dualistic schemes characteristic of modernist thought. This air of departure eventually leads to frustration: What does it mean to overcome the nature–culture or thing–human divide? How to de-colonize anthropological and archaeological thinking? What happens if we take the other or the thing seriously and how would such a perspective change our way of working?

The so called “symmetrical approaches” of inquiry inevitably challenge problems that derive from Western academic heritage leaving its mark on anthropological and archaeological thinking. However, symmetrical approaches are first and foremost a question of method; they engage in endeavours outlining anthropological or archaeological research in pragmatic terms rather than digging to deep into philosophical analyses. Instead of dwelling on theories forced on any research material, working symmetrically calls for a conceptual bedrock that evolves out of the engagement with the respective research material. In short, it calls for taking blurred lines and their re-composition seriously.

The workshop aims to – work symmetrically. During the workshop participant’s research projects will occupy the workshop’s centre stage. Participants will tentatively map out a conceptual framework based on their own research materials as well as survey related methodological consequences. The workshop does not aim to – explicitly contribute to a theoretical discourse. However, theoretical involvement with symmetrical approaches is preferable and unavoidable in this exercise.

Requirements and Application – own research project and material (including master/doctoral research/thesis) and the motivation to get involved with symmetrical thought. Master students, doctoral students and postdoctoral researchers are welcome to submit a motivational letter of 300 words (including personal information, project/material, and expectations) until 1 May 2015.

Further info: http://www.value-and-equivalence.de/veranstaltungen/workshop-blurred-lines/

 

UNHATE FOUNDATION’S/UNAI INTERNATIONAL DIVERSITY CONTEST

UNHATE FOUNDATION’S/UNAI INTERNATIONAL DIVERSITY CONTEST

This is a United Nations-sponsored writing competition for youth, ages 18-30, who are students or young professors at colleges worldwide. Youth are asked to propose specific initiatives to promote tolerance, following the guidelines of the announcement.

There will be ten winners, each of whom will receive 20,000 Euros (more than $20,000) to begin implementation of the initiative.

This is a great opportunity to give ideas to make the world better, and receive significant seed money to implement your ideas!

The deadline is April 30th. Further details at http://bsrun.org/news/diversity-contest-20000-euro-grants-being-awarded-deadline-30th-april

Call for Entries: Beyond Perception 15 Symposium

CALL FOR ENTRIES – BEYOND PERCEPTION 15 SYMPOSIUM

The University of Aberdeen warmly invites you to submit artistic proposals to the multidisciplinary symposium Beyond Perception 15, to be held in Aberdeen
from 1 September until 4 September 2015. The symposium, aptly titled Beyond Perception 15, addresses the anthropologist Tim Ingold's work over the last fifteen years, since the publication of his prominent book The Perception of the Environment in 2000. The symposium will cover five main themes, including
i) Humans, Animals, Environment;
ii) Sensibilities Beyond Science;
iii) Experiment, Experience, Education;
iv) Creativity, Correspondence, and Description;
v) Movement, Becomings, and Growth.

As a innovative interdisciplinary event that brings together anthropologists, architects, and social sciences with dancers, visual artists and filmmakers we want to give as much prominence to the non-textual and creative as possible. With this in mind we are seeking proposals for non-textual work that offers something to the conversation and dialogue that our conference themes touch upon.

2D and 3D work would be welcome, as well as auditory, visual and performative pieces. There will be space available to exhibit both inside the conference
venue and outside. Please get in touch with the Beyond Perception team (beyond.perception15@abdn.ac.uk) if you wish to submit a proposal. Each
proposal should contain a title and description of the work (maximum length 250 words), a current CV, and up to six images of the work to be shown, as well as any specific installation (spatial, technical) requirements that you may have. Deadline for proposals is June 1st 2015.

More information can be found here: http://www.abdn.ac.uk/socsci/disciplines/anthropology/beyond-perception.php

Call for Papers: Special Issue on Anthropology and Knowledge Production During the Ebola Crisis, Anthropological Quarterly

Producing Ebola: Creating Knowledge in and About an Epidemic

This proposal seeks abstracts from scholars interested in writing articles for a peer-reviewed special issue of Anthropological Quarterly on knowledge production during the Ebola epidemic, to be published in 2016. Scholars who submit abstracts are acknowledging that the timeframe for completion of these articles is exceedingly short (3-4 months from abstract acceptance) in order to ensure timeliness of the issue, and that these articles are subject to the same rigorous peer review process as the journal undertakes for any article submitted. The journal reserves the right to reject any submission as a result of regular peer review, emphasizing that the guest editors’ inclusion of an abstract in the special issue proposal does not guarantee publication. We would like to encourage interested scholars to think about articles that stand entirely on their own in terms of contributions to anthropological theory and conversations, rather than merely being additions that add color to a special issue collection.

As the Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) epidemic plaguing the West African nations of Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Guinea continues into its second year, the international community is facing difficult questions about how, in spite of vast public health education campaigns and contact tracing, the disease persists in many areas. The initial international focus on eradicating Ebola through western public health models failed to halt the disease’s spread precisely because of the omission of the importance of working within and through local social practices and disease models, for which anthropological methods and theories are critical. The early response to the epidemic was characterized by the deployment of medical missions producing and translating biomedical knowledge, an approach that devalued the consideration of local forms of knowledge production about health and illness, life and death, and the afterlife. The epidemic was exacerbated as these ‘ways of knowing’ clashed, with communities blocking healthcare workers from accessing their sick, and hiding their dead for burial in secret. Simultaneously as western healthcare workers produced and deployed knowledge about the disease in an effort to combat the epidemic, they communicated notions about expertise itself—who possesses the ability to ‘know’ Ebola, who is naturally or willfully ignorant about it, and what social and bodily comportments were required to move from one state to another. Overcoming the epidemic was revealed not as a triumph of biomedicine over a disease, but as a negotiation between western knowledge and other ways of knowing. The contributors to this issue will explore the interface of the bodies of knowledge and worldviews brought to bear on ending the Ebola epidemic, from local knowledge and practices about caring for the ill and burying the dead, to western bio-medical models involved in diagnosis, treatment, and clinical trials, to international humanitarian organizations tasked with implementing public health measures. Most importantly, we address the process of transforming anthropological knowledge itself into a way of knowing that could be readily adapted to humanitarian response, and the impact that anthropology continues to have in the continuing work of ending the epidemic.

Within all of these discussions lies the question of where anthropological knowledge is situated in global processes of responding to crises from wars to disease outbreaks. For feminist theorists, the idea of seriousness is about determining which actors have the ability to judge others as worthy of consideration; that their ideas and actions have consequences that cannot be dismissed or denied. With new engagements in the public sphere created by this epidemic, anthropologists have reinvigorated the question of public engagement in the context of producing nuanced, context-specific knowledge. The contributors to this volume will grapple with the ongoing question of how anthropological knowledge can be translated into broader statements with implications for policy and humanitarian practice.

The contributors to this proposed special issue of Anthropological Quarterly address these questions of knowledge production, translation, and expertise in articles that tackle a myriad of ‘ways of knowing’ about how communities (broadly defined) experience and understand unprecedented epidemic diseases. Contributors address facets of this crisis ranging from the creation of anthropological knowledge as expertise in itself, to the use of local knowledge in conducting safe burials, to the origination of vaccine trials within local understandings of the use of blood.

Deadlines

May 15
Submission of titles and abstracts by interested authors

July 15
Submission of finished first drafts to guest editors (editors will turn around
comments for revision by July 30)

August 30
Submission of second drafts to guest editors for submission to AQ

Catherine Bolten
University of Notre Dame
100 Hesburgh Center
Notre Dame, IN 46556
phone: 574 631 5099
Email: cbolten@nd.edu

AUSTRALIAN ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY CONFERENCE - University of Melbourne, December 2015

AUSTRALIAN ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY CONFERENCE - 2015

MORAL HORIZONS

Hosted by The University of Melbourne

1-4 December, 2015.

The call for panels for the AAS 2015 conference, Moral Horizons, is now open.

Keynote speakers will be Nancy Scheper-Hughes, Joel Robbins and Akhil Gupta.

Please see our website for theme, panel submission information and
conference details: http://www.nomadit.co.uk/aas/aas2015/cfpan.shtml

Please also connect with the conference via:

FB: https://www.facebook.com/moralhorizons

tw: @AusAnthro #moralhorizons

We look forward to welcoming you to The University of Melbourne in December.

CFP: Social Inequality and Its Consequences in the 21st Century

Social Inequality and Its Consequences in the 21st Century

Call for Papers

Contemporary Social Science,
Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences

Social Inequality and Its Consequences in the 21st Century

Guest editor: Jennifer Jarman, Lakehead University

jjarman@lakeheadu.ca

Papers are invited that explore the relevance and impact of any or all forms of social inequality. Of special interest are papers that address questions regarding the conceptualization and measurement of social inequality, as well as its direct and indirect costs.

The bases for social inequality include but are not limited to: age, citizenship status, gender, ethnicity, health status, religion, social class, and sexuality. These could be treated separately or in combination with one another. Papers with themes and approaches that cross disciplinary divides are particularly relevant, as the main audience for the journal is a community of scholars and professional practitioners seeking interdisciplinary perspectives on issues of social relevance.

Soundly empirically based studies are preferred, although high quality scholarly essays will also be considered.

Manuscripts should follow the guidelines and usual format for submission of papers to Contemporary Social Science as indicated in Instructions for Authors at: https://tinyurl.com/pud5vem

Papers should be submitted online at http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/rsoc indicating they are for this special issue.

The Guest Editor for this special issue is happy to review plans for papers in advance of their receipt. All papers will be peer reviewed. The closing date for submitting papers is April 13th, 2015.

The corresponding Guest Editor for this issue is Jennifer Jarman, Lakehead University jjarman@lakeheadu.ca

Jennifer Jarman
Lakehead University
Orillia, Ontario
Canada
L3V 6R8
Email: jjarman@lakeheadu.ca
Visit the website at http://https://tinyurl.com/pud5vem

Call For photo essay proposals for submission to Medicine Anthropology Theory (MAT)

Call For photo essay proposals for submission to Medicine Anthropology Theory (MAT)

Call For Photo Essay Proposals

Medicine Anthropology Theory is a new open-access journal that publishes scholarly articles, photo essays, reviews and reports related to medical anthropology and science and technology studies. Our first issue was just published in December 2014.

We are currently seeking photo essay submissions for future issues. Given the centrality of observing, seeing, and representing to ethnography, MAT provides a forum for researchers to present up to ten photographs that critically engage with these issues. Submissions should include an accompanying essay (1,000 words), reflecting on how photography shapes the ways in which ethnographic subjects are approached, collaborated with, framed, and presented as objects of science and art.

Please contact our editorial board with a proposal prior to submission: photo.essays@medanthrotheory.org

More information about the journal can be found here: http://www.medanthrotheory.org

Danya Fast, PhD
Photo Essay Section Editor, Medicine Anthropology Theory (MAT)
photo.essays@medanthrotheory.org
Email: photo.essays@medanthrotheory.org
Visit the website at http://www.medanthrotheory.org

Workshop call for proposals: Terminus: Archives, Ephemera, and Electronic Art

Workshop call for proposals
Terminus: Archives, Ephemera, and Electronic Art
Saturday, August 15th, 2015, Vancouver B.C.
ISEA 2015

Deadline for proposal submission: March 30th, 2015
ethnographicterminalia@gmail.com

Abstract
Since 2009, the Ethnographic Terminalia Curatorial Collective has staged annual exhibitions in major North American cities (Washington D.C., Chicago, New York, San Francisco, Montreal, New Orleans, Philadelphia) that explore the intersections of art and anthropology. Archives, ephemera, and Indigenous articulations of new media, identity, culture, language, and resistance have emerged as central themes in contemporary art-ethnographic practice and as a central interest to the curatorial work of the collective. New technologies, both materially and conceptually, present opportunities to push theoretical, disciplinary, and aesthetic boundaries. However, the implications of digitization and circulation of archival information present particularly interesting challenges for artists and scholars who seek to represent and exploit the potential of digital archives. Building on the collective’s recent exhibitions, and in conjunction with an exhibition of new media artist Geronimo Inutiq’s Arctic Noise project, co-curated for ISEA 2015 at the grunt gallery in Vancouver (Terminal City), Ethnographic Terminalia invites workshop participants to demonstrate and discuss electronic art works and theoretical frameworks that disrupt material, figurative, discursive, cultural, and political manifestations of the archive, broadly conceived. Our discussions of new technologies and archives will culminate in an experimentation with form: the outcome of the workshop will be a collectively hand-made archive/catalogue of the event that will be later digitized and circulated.

For more information please see our full call for proposals at http://ethnographicterminalia.org

Organizers: Ethnographic Terminalia Curatorial Collective: Kate Hennessy (Simon Fraser University), Trudi Lynn Smith (University of Victoria), Craig Campbell (University of Texas, Austin), Fiona P. McDonald (New Knowledge Organization, Ltd.), Stephanie Takaragawa (Chapman University); with Glenn Alteen (grunt gallery) and Tarah Hogue (grunt gallery)

Many thanks,

Dr. Trudi Lynn Smith
University of Victoria

2014/15 Artist-in-residence
Centre for Studies in Religion and Society
http://csrs.uvic.ca

Adjunct Assistant Professor
School of Environmental Studies
Coast Salish Territory
Victoria BC CANADA

CFP: Rendering the Sacred Illegal: Conflicts over Space in South Asia and its Diaspora - Madison, WI, October 2015

CFP: Rendering the Sacred Illegal: Conflicts over Space in South Asia and its Diaspora

Call for Panelists:

Annual Conference on South Asia

Madison, WI;

October 22-25. 2015

Drawing from a range of South Asian communities within and outside
the subcontinent, our panel will explore the construction and
contestation of sacred space. In urban centers, governmental and
private party delimitations on the use of space can come into
conflict with religious actors, whose strategies to claim space
sometimes seek to supersede the state’s legal boundaries. From
debates over temple demolitions to legal contestations over informal
places of worship, this panel seeks to highlight the interfaces
between religious communities and legal and political jurisdictions
and to explore what emerges from such collisions.

By examining such conflicts over space, this panel will explore the
following questions: What constitutes a religious appropriation of
public space? How does state demolition or redefinition of sacred
space affect local communities? In what ways are urbanization,
globalization, and religious diasporas redefining sacred space? And
how do religious communities develop public discourses of religiosity
in the face of legal opposition to their places of worship?

Please send a max. 250 word abstract to clairerobison@umail.ucsb.edu
and rpillai@uoregon.edu by March 27th . Include with your abstract, a
title, your institutional affiliation, and current status (faculty
position etc.).

Call for Session Proposals biannual conference of the Association of Critical Heritage Studies - June 2016, Concordia University

Call for Session Proposals
biannual conference of the Association of Critical Heritage Studies

June 2016, Concordia University

Association of Critical Heritage Studies
Third biannual Conference, Montreal, 7-10th June 2016

What does heritage change?

An initiative of the Canada Research Chair on Urban Heritage at UQAM
In partnership with Concordia University

First announcement
Call for sessions

Enquiries
achs2016@uqam.ca
www.achs2016.uqam.ca

Heritage is a powerful witness to mindsets and zeitgeist; it is commonly understood that it gives way to a better understanding of societies and even brings together communities. But how would this happen? Can heritage affect reality? What does it change?

The third ACHS Conference considers the manifestations, discourses, epistemologies, policies, and stakes of heritage—as a phenomenon, a symptom, an effect or a catalyst; as a tool of empowerment or leverage; as a physical or intangible restraint or kick-off; in communities, societies, or any material or mental environment. Subthemes range from gender-related issues to identity-making, mythologies of cultural diversity and the rethinking of heritage policies beyond the authorized heritage discourse.

The inaugural manifesto of the ACHS called for the building and the promotion of critical innovations and interventions in heritage while questioning the cultural and economic power relations that traditional understandings of heritage seem to underpin. This third Conference builds on the momentum of the previous conferences, held in Gothenburg, Sweden and in Canberra, Australia; it seeks to strengthen and broaden critical heritage studies as an inclusive area of theorisation, investigation and practice built from diverse geographical regions and disciplinary fields, such as public history, memory studies, museology, tourism studies, architecture and planning, urban studies, archaeology, geography, sociology, cultural studies, political science, anthropology, ethnology and artistic research.

Submissions to the 2016 ACHS Conference should bring innovative reflections and interdisciplinary methodologies or approaches to the critical enquiries about how and why heritage is, has been or could be made, used, studied, defined and managed, and with what effects, if any, on a society, a territory, an economy. Contributions might, for example, explore the reconstruction of narratives, the reconfiguration of social relations, knowledge production and cultural expressions, the transformation of the environment or the (de)valuation of the land. We particularly welcome papers that go beyond canon theories to interrogate discipline-based norms about heritage, and the assumptions that orient practice or decision-making. In this respect, this conference aims to continue important debates about heritage as a domain of politics and citizenship, a living environment, a source of identity and an assemblage of human-non-human relations.

In order to bring new insights to the study of heritage, the 2016 ACHS Conference is framed by the general question of “What Does Heritage Change?” It is hoped that this general question will encourage submissions relating to the following over-arching themes; other proposals are nonetheless welcome.
• Heritage performativities;
• Cultural particularization vs globalization and other transnational processes relating to heritage;
• “Imagined Communities” of heritage;
• The critical turn in public history and memory studies;
• Urban environments and planning;
• Heritage in conflicts;
• Gender in heritage-making;
• Linguistic and cultural particularizations of heritage-making and heritage studies;
• Uses of heritage in tourism, from identity-making to political economies;
• Critical sustainability perspectives on heritage and the Anthropocene;
• Diaspora, diversity and cultural citizenships;
• The rise and fall of the expert knowledge;
• Rethinking heritage policies beyond elite cultural narratives;
• The future of heritage.

This first announcement calls for submissions of either roundtables and sessions.
The conference will mainly host two session types:
- Regular paper sessions are sessions containing three or more 20-minutes papers which draw on recent research, empirical or theoretical, and relate to precise scientific approaches or methodologies to address a theme through a specific angle. These can include the participation of a discussant.
- Poster sessions are sessions in which research, research-action or research-creation are presented through 4x8 posters, gathered according to common thematic or problematic. While the posters will be on display for two days during the conference, poster sessions will be scheduled according to 5-minutes presentations per poster.

The conference will also welcome:
- Roundtables that bring together researchers, practitioners or decision-makers around a precise question, which is addressed by each participant for a maximum of 5 to 10 minutes, then through reciprocating questions, answers and dialogs animated by a chair and/or a discussant. Roundtable proposals must include a preliminary outline of content, including participants (at least 3 and up to 8) and questions to be addressed.
- As the conference whishes to expand boundaries of critical heritage studies, through research-creation or other means, it will welcome non-traditional proposals dedicated to the development of knowledge and innovation through artistic or multimedia expression and experimentation. Such research-creation sessions or installations present critically informed work, situated with research activity, in a variety of media. They can gather any number of participants and will be peer reviewed as with other proposals.

Submissions should be sent with an abstract of ±450 words outlining the objectives of the session/roundtable in relation to the goals of ACHS, as described above, and/or the themes considered. Submissions should be accompanied by a brief resume (biographical notice and main publications or achievements) of the organizer(s) and an overview of some of the main or proposed participants.

Submissions can be made in English or French.

Although a general call for papers and posters will follow this call for sessions and roundtables, it is expected that all session proposals will include a preliminary outline of content; roundtable and research-creation proposals, in particular, will also include a preliminary presentation of participants.

Session organizers will be asked at a later date to submit (or to have submitted by proposed participants) detailed paper proposals and the biographical notice of each participant through the conference website (achs2016.uqam.ca). The official opening of this general call for papers is scheduled for May 1st 2015.

Papers and posters submitted independently will be forwarded to session organizers following of their assessment by the scientific committee.

The deadline for the call for session is 1st July 2015
The deadline for the call for papers will be 1st November 2015.

Venue
Located in the largest city of the province of Quebec, second in Canada and eighth in North America, the University of Quebec in Montreal, also called “UQAM”, is one of the five major universities of Montreal. Host to approximately 40,000 students, UQAM is renowned for its research in social issues and its innovations in the creative arts. Equal in size to UQAM and sometimes called its « sister university », Concordia University is also committed to innovation and excellence in research, creative activity and community partnerships. It dares to be different and draws on its diversity to strengthen society and enrich its urban environment.
At UQAM, located in its School of Management, the Canada Research Chair on Urban Heritage which is organizing the 2016 ACHS Conference follows this path of enquiry into the social and public issues of urban phenomena, both in historical and contemporary perspectives, to promote the study and to understand heritage beyond elite narratives or crises of change, and to learn to co-manage heritage as a collective tool toward community development. The CRC on Urban Heritage at UQAM is being supported by the Centre for Oral History and Digital Storytelling, an interdisciplinary research unit of Concordia dedicated to the critical and creative engagement with living memory and place-based storytelling.

[www.international.uqam.ca/pages/anglais.aspx]
[https://www.concordia.ca/international.html]
[patrimoine.uqam.ca]
[http://storytelling.concordia.ca]
[www.esg.uqam.ca/en.html]
[ville.montreal.qc.ca/]

Confirmed Keynote Speakers
James Count Early, Director, Cultural Heritage Policy, Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
Xavier Greffe, University Professor in Economic Sciences, Paris 1 University Panthéon Sorbonne
Michael Herzfeld, Ernest E. Monrad Professor of the Social Sciences, Harvard University

See www.achs2016.uqam.ca for updates on keynote speakers, program, timetable, fees, accommodation, and committees.


Organizing Committee

Lucie K. Morisset, Scientific Director, Canada Research Chair on Urban Heritage and PARVI Research Group, Professor, Department of Urban and Touristic Studies, University of Quebec in Montreal
Luc Noppen, Chairholder, Canada Research Chair on Urban Heritage, Professor, Department of Urban and Touristic Studies, University of Quebec in Montreal
Steven High, Chairholder, Canada Research Chair in Public History and Director, Centre for Oral History and Digital Storytelling
Marie-Blanche Fourcade, Visiting Professor, Department of Art History, University of Quebec in Montreal
Martin Drouin, Professor, Department of Urban and Touristic Studies, University of Quebec in Montreal
Julia Csergo, Professor, Department of Urban and Touristic Studies, University of Quebec in Montreal
Tim Winter, Research Professor in Cultural Heritage, Alfred Deakin Research Institute, Cultural Heritage Centre for Asia and the Pacific, Deakin University

Clarence Epstein, Senior Director, Urban and Cultural Affairs, Concordia University
Marie-Josée Allard, Director, Hospitality Concordia
Sophie Laberge, conseillère, Service des communications, University of Quebec in Montreal
Mathieu Dormaels, postdoctoral researcher, University of Quebec in Rimouski
Jean-Sébastien Sauvé, postdoctoral researcher, University of Quebec in Montreal
Jessica Mace, postdoctoral researcher, University of Quebec in Montreal
Jessica Roda, postdoc researcher, University of Quebec in Montreal
Myriam Joannette, PhD candidate, University of Quebec in Montreal
Jean-François Cloutier-Deraîche, master student, University of Quebec in Montreal


Scientific Committee

Jean-Yves Andrieux (Paris 4 University)
Pierre Anctil (University of Ottawa)
Allison Bain (Laval University)
Étienne Berthold (Laval University)
Christina Cameron (University of Montreal)
Julia Csergo (University of Quebec in Montreal)
Philippe Dubé (Laval University)
Martin Drouin (University of Quebec in Montreal)
Marie-Blanche Fourcade (University of Quebec in Montreal)
Annick Germain (INRS-Urbanisation, culture, société)
John Giblin (University of Western Sydney)
Julien Goyette (University of Quebec in Rimouski)
Maria Gravari-Barbas (Paris 1 University)
Xavier Greffe (Paris 1 University)
Marc Grignon (Laval University)
Florence Hachez-Leroy (University of Artois)
Cynthia Hammond (Concordia University)
Karine Hébert (University of Quebec in Rimouski)
Kate Hennessy (Simon Fraser University)
Rodney Harrison (University College London)
Steven High (Concordia University)
Marc Jacobs (Faro)
Cyril Isnart (Centre national de la recherche scientifique)
Olivier Lazzarotti (Picardie-Jules Verne University)
Erica Lehrer (Concordia University)
Jean-Michel Leniaud (Paris 1 University)
John Leroux (University of New Brunswick)
Jean-Claude Marsan (University of Montreal)
Steven Mannell (Dalhousie University)
Guy Mercier (Laval University)
Lucie K. Morisset (University of Quebec in Montreal)
Dominique Poulot (Paris 1 University)
Michel Rautenberg (University of Saint-Étienne)
Ronald Rudin (Concordia University)
Shiwei Shen (Ningbo University)
Laurajane Smith (Australian National University)
Michelle Stefano (University of Maryland)
Will Straw (McGill University)
Astrid Svenson (Brunel University)
Jean-Louis Tornatore (University of Bourgogne)
Tom Urbaniak (Cape Breton University)
France Vanlaethem (University of Quebec in Montreal)
Vincent Veschambre (ENSA Lyon)
Emma Waterton (University of Western Sydney)
Rhodri Windsor Liscombe (University of British Columbia)
Ola Wetterberg (University of Gothenburg)
Michael Windover (Carleton University)
Tim Winter (Deakin University)

Partners

Canada Research Chair on Urban Heritage, UQAM
PARVI Group
Concordia University
Tourism Montreal
School of Management, UQAM
Département d’études urbaines et touristiques, UQAM
Canada Research Chair in Public History, Concordia University
Centre interuniversitaire d’études sur les lettres, les arts et les traditions
Centre de recherche en tourisme et en patrimoine
Center for Oral History and Digital Storytelling
Fonds de recherche du Québec sur la société et la culture

Colloque GenERe: Le(s) genre(s) Définitions, mod èles, épistémologie - décembre 2015, ENS de Lyon

Colloque GenERe: appel à communication

Le(s) genre(s)
Définitions, modèles, épistémologie

Colloque de clôture du Laboratoire Junior de l’ENS de Lyon GenERe

ENS de Lyon 17 et 18 décembre 2015

Né en 2014 de la collaboration d’une trentaine d’étudiant∙e∙s de master et de doctorat inscrit∙e∙s dans des disciplines variées des Sciences Humaines et Sociales et des Sciences Expérimentales, le laboratoire junior GenERe (Genre : Epistémologie & Recherche) prendra fin en 2015. Pendant deux ans, cette structure nous a permis d’organiser des journées d’étude sur des thèmes variés (« Genre et Bande Dessinée », « Genre et politiques publiques », « Que faire de la “théorie du genre” ? »…), des rencontres avec des militant∙e∙s et personnalités comme Pinar Selek ou Jeffrey Weeks, et un premier colloque en décembre 2014 sur les liens entre « Genre et sexualités ». Pour notre deuxième et dernier colloque, prévu pour décembre 2015, nous avons décidé de revenir aux motivations originelles de ce projet collaboratif et pluridisciplinaire, en proposant deux jours de réflexions sur des questions épistémologiques.

Cet appel à communication vise les chercheur∙e∙s de toutes disciplines, jeunes ou établi∙e∙s. Il est structuré à partir de 8 axes principaux par lesquels nous proposons d’interroger les implications épistémologiques des recherches sur le genre.

I- De quoi parle-t-on ?

Poser la question de l’épistémologie du genre, c’est inévitablement poser celle de sa (ses) définition(s). Or, si le terme s’est aujourd’hui institutionnalisé, notamment dans le champ académique, son usage n’est pas toujours interrogé et relève encore souvent de l’évidence. Concept, outil d’analyse, « lunettes » (Clair, 2012) ou encore objet de recherche, ses désignations sont multiples et correspondent à des réalités différentes, selon les dénominations, les positions théoriques, les choix méthodologiques ou encore les disciplines. La question qui se pose est donc la suivante : de quoi parle-t-on lorsqu’on parle de genre ?

Si un certain consensus semble exister dans le champ académique autour d’une approche relationnelle et hiérarchique du genre (Bereni et al., 2012), cette acception reste très large et laisse de nombreuses zones d’ombre. La première étant celle de la nature du genre (quel est le lien entre sexe et genre ? Faut-il utiliser le singulier ou le pluriel ? Le terme relève-t-il d’un positionnement ou d’un engagement politique ?), qui n’est pas sans lien avec la pluralité des paradigmes féministes ayant participé de l’émergence et de la diffusion du terme (féminismes matérialiste, libéral, queer, etc.). La seconde est celle de son opérationnalité et de ses effets. Suffit-il, par exemple, de parler d’inégalités (entre hommes et femmes, entre homosexuel∙le∙s et hétérosexuel∙le∙s) pour parler de genre ? Ne faut-il pas également travailler à brouiller et dépasser les catégories de genre pour rompre avec une pensée binaire constitutive du système patriarcal (Butler, 1990) ?

Axe 1 : Le genre, les genres ?

Axe 2 : Le genre, objet ou outil ?

II- Qui parle et d’où ?

Les études de genre ne permettent pas seulement un enrichissement considérable des connaissances dans des domaines jusque-là négligés par les savoirs institués, ainsi qu’une déstabilisation de ces savoirs et des catégories d’analyse qui leur sont associées. Elles constituent également un apport épistémologique majeur quant à la construction des savoirs scientifiques et à leur dimension politique, dans la lignée ouverte par l’épistémologie critique féministe. Les Feminist Science Studies ont permis de questionner la place des femmes dans les sciences et ont adopté l’angle du genre pour interroger les contenus scientifiques (Puig de la Bellacasa, 2013). En pensant à partir de l’expérience des femmes et des groupes minorisés en général (dont la marginalisation n’est pas liée à une minorité numéraire mais à une position défavorable dans les rapports de domination) les féministes du standpoint (du « point de vue ») font émerger la connaissance liée à ces positions sociales et à l’expérience de la domination. Cette démarche contribue à politiser la science en mettant à jour les processus de pouvoir qui sous-tendent la construction des savoirs dits « scientifiques ». On peut alors se demander, par exemple, dans quelle mesure l’épistémologie du genre s’inscrit dans ce projet d’épistémologie féministe, et quels usages politiques et scientifiques sont faits des notions de point de vue, de situation et de connaissance située dans le champ des études de genre.

Axe 4 – Épistémologies féministes, épistémologies du genre

Axe 5 – Épistémologies du point de vue : savoirs, recherche et engagement, militantisme

Axe 8 – Épistémologies de l’intersectionnalité

III- Peut-on en parler ensemble ?

La structuration en champ d’études des recherches sur le genre a plusieurs conséquences problématiques. On note en effet, en vue de renforcer l’assise universitaire du champ, une tendance au consensus et à l’effacement de certains débats de fond entre théoricien∙ne∙s, pourtant issu∙e∙s de disciplines variées et offrant différents points de vue sur les phénomènes socio-culturels questionnés. La promesse pluridisciplinaire de ce champ ne semble toutefois en rien garantir la transdisciplinarité du concept même de genre : est-il le même parmi les disciplines des sciences humaines et sociales ? Et qu’en est-il du rapport de celles-ci avec les sciences exactes et expérimentales ? À différentes disciplines, différentes méthodologies, approches et définitions. Les études de genre constitueraient donc à la fois un modèle neuf pour la recherche et l’enseignement (permettant notamment l’émergence de nouveaux champs de recherche : queer studies, porn studies, trans studies), et un lieu problématique de rupture avec (et entre) les disciplines d’origine (Nouvelles Questions Féministes, Vol. 22, No 1, 2003). Avec l’entrée dans le monde académique des recherches sur le genre, héritées entre autres de réflexions militantes, naît ainsi une tension persistante entre une nécessité de légitimation et la volonté de conserver une distance (critique) vis-à-vis d’une institution qui s’appuie sur des structures et valeurs contre lesquelles les études de genre se sont d’abord inscrites.

Axe 3 – La question des studies : des gender studies sont-elles pertinentes ? Disciplinarité, logiques institutionnelles.

Axe 6 – Le genre est-il devenu mainstream ? Faut-il se réjouir de l’institutionnalisation du genre ?

Axe 7 – Le genre est-il forcément pluridisciplinaire ?

IV- Ne pas penser le genre seul

Penser le genre comme concept, c’est donc questionner son autonomie à plusieurs niveaux. En effet, le genre fait jouer les dissensions ainsi que les points de jonction entre les disciplines. Cependant, penser l’épistémologie du genre, c’est aussi l’interroger comme ligne de partage social, et interroger, dans le même mouvement, son lien avec d’autres lignes, de partage, d’interférence, de rupture. Cela implique de penser leurs intersections et les rapports de pouvoir et de domination qui en découlent (Dorlin, 2009). Les études de genre questionnent ainsi le découpage et les points de rencontre entre sexe, genre et sexualité, mais aussi les divisions fondées sur la classe, la « race », l’âge, le handicap, etc. Si l’on conçoit le genre comme créant de la division, de l’opposition, de l’incompatibilité, alors il faut aussi s’interroger sur les conséquences politiques de cette fracture et sur les stratégies consistant à la replacer parmi d’autres.

Axe 7 – Le genre est-il forcément plurisciplinaire ?

Axe 8 – Épistémologies de l’intersectionnalité

Modalités de soumission des communications

Le colloque pluridisciplinaire organisé par le laboratoire junior GenERe se tiendra les jeudi 17 et vendredi 18 décembre 2015 à l’ENS de Lyon.

Confériencier∙e∙s invité∙e∙s : Éric Fassin (sociologie, Paris 8), Claude Gautier (philosophie, ENS de Lyon), Marie-Anne Paveau (sciences du langage, Paris 13), Christine Planté (littérature, Lyon 2) et Michèle Zancarini-Fournel (histoire, Lyon 1).

Les contributions pourront prendre la forme d’une communication (individuelle ou collaborative) ou d’un atelier. Les propositions sont attendues sous forme électronique (en format .doc) avant le 15 mai 2015 à l’adresse labogenere@gmail.com.

Elles devront comporter les informations suivantes :

Nom, prénom, adresse électronique, discipline et institution de rattachement de chaque auteur.e
Pour une communication : titre de la communication, axe(s) dans le(s)quel(s) elle s’inscrit, mots-clés (5 maximum), résumé de 3000 signes maximum (références incluses)
Pour un atelier : titre de l’atelier et résumé de la problématique générale de celui-ci (1500 signes maximum) ; pour les trois ou quatre (maximum) participant∙e∙s : titre de la communication, axe(s) dans le(s)quel(s) elle s’inscrit, mots-clés (5 maximum), résumé de 3000 signes maximum (références incluses)
Calendrier :

Date limite de soumission : 15 mai 2015
Avis aux auteur∙e∙s : 30 juin 2015
Avant le 15 novembre : envoi d’un résumé détaillé de la communication aux président∙e∙s d’atelier (10 000 à 15 000 signes)
Remarque : L’inscription est gratuite. Le laboratoire junior prend en charge les repas sur les deux jours du colloque pour les intervenant·e·s (le jeudi midi et soir ainsi que le vendredi midi). Il ne prend pas en charge les frais de déplacement et de logement des intervenant·e·s.

Comité scientifique :

Anne-Charlotte Husson (sciences du langage, Université Paris 13)

Lucie Jégat (sociologie, ENS de Lyon)

Marion Maudet (sociologie, EHESS)

Lucy Michel (linguistique, Université de Bourgogne)

Vanina Mozziconacci (philosophie, ENS de Lyon)

Laura Tatoueix (histoire, Université de Rouen)

Cécile Thomé (sociologie, EHESS)

Maxime Triquenaux (littérature, Université Lyon 2)

Marie Walin (histoire ENS de Lyon)

Chinese and African Sustainable Urbanization: A Global Perspective Conference - October 2015, University of Ottawa

Conference: Chinese and African Sustainable Urbanization: A Global Perspective
Call for Papers: Conference @ University of Ottawa - 2015 International Conference on Chinese and African Sustainable Urbanization: A Global Perspective

October 24-25, 2015

Organizers:University of Ottawa, UN-Habitat

Coordinator: Canada China Thinking Network

ICCASU Website:http://chinaeam.uottawa.ca/ICCASU/

We are inviting proposal submissions to present a paper, poster, to organize a workshop, forum or panel at the 2015 International Conference on Chinese and African Sustainable Urbanization (ICCASU), at the University of Ottawa, Canada, October 24-25, 2015.

Over the last several decades China and many African countries have experienced significant and rapid urbanization processes. The accelerated pace of China’s urbanization will have substantial impacts on the country's urban systems that differ from those of other developing states. The challenges and opportunities in China’s cities provide unique insight into urbanization processes in other developing regions, particularly that of Africa. Recent Chinese investments in many African countries not only significantly impacts economic development on the continent, but also have important implications for urban development strategies and policies. As such, a discussion of China’s urbanization outcomes is both meaningful and practical for policy-related decision-making in African states.

This conference will focus on urbanization challenges in China and African states, as well as China’s exportation of its urbanization strategies to Africa. Organizers anticipate considerable insight resulting from academic research and practical applications, particularly toward the enhancement of sustainable urbanization which can be used to confront potential and existing challenges in urbanization across the world. This conference will thus provide a platform for scholars, professionals, policy-makers, experts and the private sector to exchange views on the state of current urbanization in China and many Africa countries from an international perspective. The western and other regions’ urbanization experiences are also welcome to contribute to the discussion. Scholars and practitioners across disciplines are invited to submit abstracts or specific panels corresponding with the themes listed below.

Topics of interest for papers, presentations and poster sessions include but are not limited to: a) Urbanization dynamics i. Urbanization mode ii. Urbanization process, analysis and modeling iii. Urbanization and ecotourism b) Urbanization, sustainability and planning i. Urbanization, environment, sustainability and planning ii. Ecosystem approaches for urbanization assessment iii. Urbanization and land use iv. Urbanization, social equality and economic efficiency v. Urbanization, globalization and climate change c) Urbanization, strategies and policies i. Western urban development ii. Urbanization strategies d) Urbanization, 3S application and analyzing methods i. GIS, GPS, and RS applications ii. Mathematical and spatial modeling iii. Intelligent Information Processing e) Urbanization and Smart cities. i. Tele-Health ii. Information and Communication technology application. iii. Clean and renewable energy iv. Green cities and environment. v. Low carbon footprint economies vi. Creative economies

Keynote speakers:

Alioune Badiane, Director, Programme Division, UN-Habitat, John Zacharias, Chair Professor, Peking University, China, Caroline Andrew, Professor Emeritus, University of Ottawa, Canada, The ambassador from one of African Embassies in Ottawa, Canada (TBC)

Conference Official Languages: English and French

Deadline for submission of abstract: June 30, 2015

Abstracts of 250 words accepted in English and/or French

More information:http://chinaeam.uottawa.ca/ICCASU/

Human Being Human, Interdisciplinary Graduate Conference, May 2015, University of Victoria

Human Being Human, Interdisciplinary Graduate Conference, May 23-25, 2015, University of Victoria

Deadline: March 14, 2015

https://humanbeinghuman2015.wordpress.com/

Call for Proposals: Indigenizing Pilgrimage:growing, identifying & localizing transformative journeys - May 2015 – Concordia University

Papers (sessions extension) - Indigenizing Pilgrimage:growing,
identifying & localizing transformative journeys - May 7-10, 2015 –
Concordia University

Deadline: March 15, 2015

Join us for an international, multidisciplinary conference “Indigenizing
Pilgrimage:growing, identifying & localizing transformative journeys” May
7-10, 2015 – Concordia University

Montréal, Québec, Canada

Keynote speakers: Simon Coleman is Chancellor Jackman Professor,
Department for the Study of Religion, University of Toronto. He is
co-editor of the journal Religion and Society, and of the Ashgate Studies
in Pilgrimage book series.

Raymond Aldred is Assistant Professor of Theology, Ambrose University
(Calgary), and works with My People International. He is former Director
for the First Nations Alliance Churches of Canada. He is status Cree.

How can one travel without attending to the ground beneath one's feet? In
2014, a group of

professors and students from Concordia University's Department of
Theological Studies undertook a 32 kilometre pilgrimage, De Vieux-Montréal
à Kahnawa:ké. This walk stretched between historic pilgrimage centres
founded to honour two 17th century women, one a French settler at Fort
Ville Marie (Montréal), and the other, a woman of Algonquin and Mohawk
parentage. Whatever our theoretical assumptions at the outset, as pilgrims
we walked toward an understanding that pilgrimage on this land necessarily
involves recognizing the complex, contested and still unfolding story of
Turtle Island (North America), as locus of encounter between indigenous and
settler peoples.

Indigenizing Pilgrimage: Growing, Identifying and Localizing Transformative
Journey will take

place from May 7-10, 2015, at Concordia University in Montréal. It is
jointly sponsored by the

Department of Theological Studies and the Loyola College for Diversity and
Sustainability. The conference will bring together scholars and pilgrims
from across disciplines to discuss journey, indigeneity and locality. One
of the conference keynote addresses and at least one presentation session
will focus on journey in aboriginal contexts. We invite you to join us on
this pilgrimage of discovery.

We invite proposals for 20 minute presentations (academic papers,
performance and artistic

presentations) that explore the complexities of personal, social and/or
religious pilgrimage, and the inculturation of journey-scapes.
Presentations may focus on journey in Indigenous contexts and/or on issues
of place, locality and meaning in the practice of pilgrimage. We are also
interested in a wide range of pilgrimage studies issues from across
interdisciplinary and practical spheres. Proposals of 300-400 words are
invited from all relevant disciplines; these should be submitted by March
15, 2015 to IndigenizingPilgrimage@gmail.com. Please attach a CV as well.
Acceptances will be sent out by April 1, 2015; registration will also be
open by April 1. (Webpage currently under construction: notification to
follow). There will be a nominal registration fee of $20 CAD, as well as an
optional Conference dinner on Saturday night, and a pilgrimage field trip
in Vieux-Montréal on Sunday afternoon, (fees TBA; will be payable on
conference registration website). The possibility of pursuing publication
of an edited volume Indigenizing Pilgrimage will be considered once the
presentation proposals are finalized. In conjunction with this conference,
the Theological Studies Graduate Student Association (TSGSA) at Concordia
will host undergraduate and graduate student paper sessions, performances
and art presentations during the day on May 8. The focus is Pilgrimage:
Sacred Journeys. Papers accepted for presentation will be invited to
publish in an upcoming issue of the Concordia University graduate journal
of theological studies, Word in the World. Should students working in
Pilgrimage Studies be interested in presenting research or art work, they
are invited to contact Robin Stanford of the TSGSA at
submissions.witw@gmail.com.

Communications Coordinator: Cristina Plamadeala Contact:
indigenizing.pilgrimage@gmail.com

Student Conference Coordinator: Robin Stanford Contact:
submissions.witw@gmail.com

Cost: $15.00 FYI: Chapelle website : http://www.marguerite-bourgeoys.com/en/

 

CFP: Journal - Diaspora, Indigenous, and Minority Education

Journal - Diaspora, Indigenous, and Minority Education

Deadline: Ongoing

Diaspora, Indigenous, and Minority Education invites research from a
variety of theoretical and methodological perspectives that emphasize the
centrality of marginal voices and a

peripheral gaze, and which draw attention to the complex interrelations
between political, economic, historical, and social contexts, as well as
the ways in which these various contexts shape educational policies,
practices, curricula, and outcomes.

The journal welcomes articles that ground theoretical reflections in
specific empirical research and case studies of diverse locations and
peoples as yet underrepresented within scholarly research and literature,
as well as action or participatory research studies of exemplary or “best”
practices.

Diaspora, Indigenous, and Minority Education: Studies of Migration,
Integration, Equity, and Cultural Survival (DIME) ­ a quarterly
peer-reviewed journal focused on critical discourse and research in
diaspora, indigenous, and minority education ­ is dedicated to researching
cultural sustainability in a world increasingly consolidating under
national, transnational, and global organizations. It aims to draw
attention to, and learn from, the many initiatives being conducted around
the globe in support of diaspora, indigenous, and minority education, which
might otherwise go unnoticed.

Please visit
http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=hdim20&page=instructions#.VOTPvrDF-Ns

for more information about the journal and the submission process.

CFP: Anthropology Southern Africa Annual Conference - Ethnography and Worlds Otherwise, August-September 2015

Anthropology Southern Africa Annual Conference
Ethnography and Worlds Otherwise

For more information:

CFP poster

Symposium on Technological Unemployment and the Future of Work - Congress, Ottawa, June 2015

Symposium on Technological Unemployment and the Future of Work, June 3, 2015
Congress 2015, Ottawa

On June 3, 2015, the Institute for Science, Society and Policy (ISSP, uOttawa), will be hosting a symposium on the Technological Unemployment and the Future of Work at the 84th Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences at the University of Ottawa.

This half day symposium will address the idea that advances in technology and artificial intelligence may soon allow machines to replace workers in jobs traditionally thought to be unfit for automation such as airline pilot, accountant and professor. The session will explore these themes by unpacking trends in emerging technologies and assessing their potential impact on jobs.

Our keynote speaker will be Dr. Nick Bostrom of Oxford University and Director, Future of Humanity Institute (http://www.fhi.ox.ac.uk/about/staff/). Dr. Bostrom is an expert on the ethics and risks of artificial intelligence and is the author of the recent book Superintelligence: Paths, Dangers, Strategies.

Visit the Congress 2015 event page:

http://congress2015.ca/program/events/unemployment-and-future-work

Registration for Congress 2015 is now open:

http://congress2015.ca//register

Conference Call for Abstracts - Digital Queers

The call for abstract is available at this link
http://ocradst.org/digitalqueers2015/publication-cfp/

.

The conference website can be found here
http://ocradst.org/digitalqueers2015/

.

*Call for Papers*

Digital Queers is a conference that will focus on issues related to social
justice for the gay community at large. The evolution of society has led to
an increased acceptance of the LGBTQA world – in part due to more open and
vociferous stances of the multiple communities of gender minorities and in
part to the role that contemporary digital media have played in reshaping
communication and advocacy. Unfortunately we are far from achieving that
social justice necessary to avoid discrimination in the work place or to
avoid persecutions of individuals and communities across the world. What
are then the new practices that should be pursued in order to achieve and
ensure social justice for all?

The conference will analyze the following themes, but will be open to a
wide range of proposals in the field that tackle the issues from a variety
of perspectives.

1. Equality, now!
2. Social Justice for Gender Minorities
3. Digital Guerrilla for Social Justice?
4. Digital Media and Gender Stories
5. Exporting Gender Equality?
6. Social Justice in the Workplace
7. Gender Communities and Strife
8. Practical Steps for Social Justice
9. Multiple Definitions of Gender
10. Digital Queers’ Revolution

The aim of the conference is to bring together social justice advocates,
contemporary theoreticians, gender hacktivists, scholars, anthropologists,
visual culture experts, curators and ‘LGBTQA revolutionaries.’ The
conference speakers will present papers that respond to the themes of
social justice and the role of digital media in reshaping the public image
of the queer community. In particular the conference is looking at
recording and developing new practices for social justice and public
engagement that face up to the still looming problems of discrimination
that the gay community at large faces nationally and internationally.

*Chairs*: Lanfranco Aceti and Sven Travis

*Keynotes*: to be announced.

*300 to 500 words abstract submissions*. Please send your submissions to:
info@ocradst.org

*Email Subject Header*: Digital Queers 2015.

*Deadline*: March 31, 2015.

*The conference is free of charge.*

The best conference papers will be selected for a special volume with
the Leonardo
Electronic Almanac

..

For registration, information and updates please subscribe to the newsletter

..

For all information about Operational and Curatorial Research (OCR), Museum
of Contemporary Cuts (MoCC), Leonardo Electronic Almanac and my personal
practices this is the newsletter's link

..

This conference is part of a series of events on gender and social justice
organized and chaired by Lanfranco Aceti as part of the OCR
<http://lanfrancoaceti.us4.list-manage1.com/track/click?u=fb059f50250c390a53a5d04db&id=753d4ab142&e=c96bc2315d>
research projects.

 

Call for Papers & Participation: Engaging Boredom Symposium @ Queen's University, April 2015

ENGAGING BOREDOM CFP
April 26, 2015
Wallace Hall, John Deutsch University Centre
Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario
Boredom can be perceived as both stifling and liberating: as an emptiness to be avoided or else as a overflowing of time and space. In this view boredom is monotonous, repetitive, and dull, but it is also a potential source of insight and creativity - a pause that gives perspective or an empty space to be filled.

This symposium seeks to engage boredom and to explore the dangers and potentials it represents in a way that moves beyond the confines of traditional academic conferences. We welcome proposals for participation of the following types:

1. Academic papers (10-20 minutes)
2. Presentations from community organizations (10-20 minutes)
3. Workshops or activities (30-75 minutes)
4. Performances (10-30 minutes)

Academic Keynote: Dr. Michael E. Gardiner (Western). Dr. Gardiner is Professor of Sociology at Western University, where he researches theories of affect, especially boredom, in relation to political economy. He will be speaking on the sociology of boredom.

Community Keynote: Nathan Townend (Kingston). Townend is interim-President of the Kingston Greens and Green Party candidate for Kingston and The Islands in the 2015 federal election. He will be speaking on boredom and political apathy.

PROPOSALS
Please send proposals to engagingboredom@gmail.com by April 1st 2015 and include the name(s) and university affiliation(s) and/or other relevant affiliation(s) of the presenters. Please specify the amount of time required as well as audio, visual, and space requirements.

* For academic presentations, please send a publication-ready titled abstract of 200-300 words.

* For presentations, workshops, and performances, please send an outline (~1 page) of the proposed presentation, workshop, or performance, including a description of the organization(s) involved (if applicable) and a brief explanation of the ways the proposed presentation, workshop, or performance engages boredom or related themes.

For more information visit engagingboredom.wordpress.com

POSSIBLE THEMES:
Apathy - eg. activist interventions into political apathy
Art - eg. artworks or studies of art history and visual culture that thematize boredom (eg. John Baldessari's "I will not make any more boring art") employ repetitive mark-making (eg. pointillism), rely on algorithms (eg. Jorinde Voigt's schematic line drawings), or explore extreme formal reduction (eg. minimalism).
Attention - eg. boredom as unfocused attention; neuroscientific studies on the perceptual effects of attention and focus, for example, the role of attention in the "binding problem"
Boredom and Modernity - eg. boredom as social alienation; historical studies on the affective consequences of the shift from rural to urban life in the industrializing West; phenomenology of factory line labour
Choice - eg. choice overload in our options as consumers; debates around the secularizing or disenchanting effects of ideological and religious pluralism
Creativity - eg. artist talks or practitioner anecdotes on boredom as either a stifle or a boon to creativity; philosophical, psychological, or sociocultural studies on the relationship between boredom and creativity; writer's block or creative block vs. flow (re: Mihály Csíkszentmihályi's theory of "flow")
Depression - eg. psychological studies of how lack of interest, flat affect, and psychomotor retardation figure in diagnosis and treatment of depression
Emptiness - eg. from existential emptiness in movements and ideologies like nihilism or Dada, to spatial emptiness in theories of the sublime
Leisure/Play - eg. the loss of distinction between leisure and labour activities as the same information communication technologies are used in both work and play; the changing forms of children's play and imagination in the context of digital overstimulation or "information overload"
Literature - eg. literary works or studies that have thematized or reproduced boredom (mid-century conceptualists' "uncreative writing," Kenneth Goldsmith's concept of the "unboring boring," the Russian genre of "boredom novels" (lishni chelovek), David Foster Wallace's novel The Pale King)
Meaning - eg. boredom as a spiritual or philosophical affliction, from acedia in The Desert Fathers to ennui as a bourgeois distinction
Meditation/Contemplation - eg. the differences between "superficial" and "profound" boredom; boredom as a meditative state; workshops on enduring or embracing boredom in meditative practices
Morality - eg. boredom as the root of evil - the connection between boredom and anxiety, boredom and cruelty, boredom and antisocial tendencies - in philosophical and theological thought (Baudelaire, Kierkegaard, etc.); contemporary depictions of boredom as a moral failing in an overdeveloped world
Procrastination - eg. boredom from an educational or managerial perspective - strategies on how to find interest in rote tasks
Repetition - eg. boredom as predictability, or repetitiveness (Benjamin on boredom and the cycles of fashion in The Arcades Project; Nietzsche's concept of the eternal return; Deleuze's concept of difference and repetition)
Time - eg. boredom characterized as an experience of time slowed, stilled, or warped in theories of time consciousness (Heidegger, Husserl, Bergson)

Call For Proposals: “Mapping Nations, Locating Citizens” An interdisciplinary conference on nationalism and identity - October 2015, Humber College

Call For Proposals:

Conference: "Mapping Nations, Locating Citizens" An interdisciplinary conference on nationalism and identity
Dates: October 30 – 31, 2015
Institution: Humber College / International Festival of Authors,
Location: Harbourfront Centre, Toronto, Canada
Submission Deadline: May 10, 2015

Humber College's School of Liberal Arts and Sciences of Toronto, Canada in association with the International Festival of Authors (IFOA) will be presenting its second annual conference entitled "Mapping Nations, Locating Citizens" an interdisciplinary conference to be held October 30-31 2015. The International Festival of Authors (IFOA), one of the most celebrated literary festivals in the world, is located at the Harbourfront Centre, one of downtown Toronto's major cultural and artistic venues.

The conference aims to facilitate cross-disciplinary discussion among scholars and researchers who study the topics of nationalism and identity. Some emergent themes to be explored include, but are not limited to:

performing citizenship
emerging nationhood
subaltern studies
statelessness
diaspora studies
racism and nationalism
post-nationalism
memory and nation-building
neo-medieval
religo-ethno-nationalism
cosmopolitanism
exploding mythologies
consumerism
sexuality and citizenship
disability/identity

To submit a proposal, please visit the "Call for Proposals" tab on the conference website located here:

http://www.humber.ca/liberalarts-ifoa/call-proposals.http://www.humber.ca/liberalarts-ifoa/call-proposals.

 

For further information, please contact the co-chairs of the organizing committee at HLA_IFOA@humber.ca

 

Beyond the 49th Parallel: Canada and the North – Issues and Challenges: Conference of the Central European Association for Canadian Studies - October 2015, Zagreb, Croatia

7th Triennial International Conference
of the Central European Association for Canadian Studies
9 – 11 October 2015, Zagreb, Croatia

Beyond the 49th Parallel: Canada and the North – Issues and Challenges

Keynote speakers: Prof. Aritha van Herk (University of Calgary, Canada)
Prof. Daniel Chartier (l'Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada)
Special guest: Prof. Mark Anthony Jarman (University of New Brunswick, Canada)

North, in Western culture, is the fundamental direction.
As a geographical notion, "the North" can be used to indicate any or all locations in the northern hemisphere, from the equator to the North Pole. In relation to the United States, all of Canada can be seen as "the North". But within Canada there is a whole range of different "Norths", both historically and at present: the "Pays d'en Haut" of the voyageurs, the old Northwest, today's camping and cottage country "up north", the northern regions of many of the provinces (differing across the country), the northern territories (Yukon, the Northwest Territories, Nunavut), the Far North. Each of these reflects a different kind of "nordicity", to use Canadian geographer Louis-Edmond Hamelin's now widely adopted term.
Beyond geography, "the North" is also a concept, one that encompasses a broad range of meanings and symbolic values. It is an imagined space as well as a space for the imaginary, a space of myth as well as a space shaped by myth, by turns cruel and ennobling, enigmatic and inspiring, powerful and fragile. The country's "northerness" is often viewed as one of its distinguishing features, a vital element in the Canadian identity – even when "the North" in this case may mean only the non-urban part of Canada north of the thin populated band hugging the border with the United States. It is also a source of pride – "the true North, strong and free" – and, increasingly, in an era of climate change, a challenge. Canada's imagined and real Norths have been literary and cultural obsessions for centuries.
The aim of this conference is to explore both the literal and the imaginative aspects of the relationship between Canada and "the North" – geographical, economic, literary, linguistic, cultural, social, political, diplomatic, environmental. We seek submissions from all disciplines that deal with Canada and Canadian Studies.
The topics may include but are NOT limited to:
- the North and its representations: real and imaginary territory
- the North in Canadian literature: nordicity and its varieties
- First Nations artwork and literature
- the symbolic North in Canadian culture: hockey, curling, winter carnivals, canoes
- living in the North: Aboriginal communities, the life and survival of traditional cultures, demography and development of local communities, social problems
- North and South: Canada as America's "North", southern Canada and its "North"
- decision-making in the North: the roles of federal, provincial and territorial governments and of local administration
- the North and economic questions: exploitation of resources, gas and oil exploration, tourism
- the North and the international community: defense of Canadian sovereignty, the Arctic Council
We welcome proposals for twenty-minute presentations in the field of Canadian Studies. We accept paper proposals in English and French. Abstracts of between 150 and 250 words + a brief CV (150 words) should be submitted via the Paper Proposal Submission Form, which is to be found on the conference website. This must be sent by 20 March 2015to the conference e-mail zagreb2015conference@gmail.com. Notification of acceptance of paper by 20 April 2015.

Conference website: http://zagreb2015.hkad.hr/

For more information, email us at zagreb2015conference@gmail.com
After the conference, selected papers will appear in a special publication issued by the Central European Association for Canadian Studies.

Organizing Committee of the Croatian-Canadian Academic Society:
Vanja Polić (University of Zagreb)
Evaine Le Calve – Ivičević (University of Zagreb)
Marija Paprašarovski (University of Zagreb)
Secretaries:
Hrvoje Puh (University of Zagreb)
Nikola Kajin (University of Zagreb)
Academic Advisory Board for the Central European Association for Canadian Studies:
Rodica Albu (Al. I. Cuza University of Iasi)
Jason Blake (University of Ljubljana)
Janos Kenyeres (Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest)
Lucia Otrísalová (Comenius University, Bratislava)
Don Sparling (Masaryk University, Brno)
Diana Yankova (New Bulgarian University, Sofia)

Call For Papers: Intersectional Approaches to Surveillance - Queen's University, June 2015

*CALL FOR PAPERS:*

*Surveillance Studies Centre Workshop 2015: Intersectional Approaches to
Surveillance*

*11-13 June 2015, Queen's University (Donald Gordon Centre), Kingston, ON,
Canada*

This workshop strives to bring intersectionality to the forefront of
surveillance studies. As surveillance studies becomes increasingly
multidisciplinary and post-structural, a thought-provoking
frontier for surveillance scholars is to critically focus on the ways in
which identity-based discrimination can impact surveillance processes and
lived experiences of surveillance. Surveillance studies has traditionally
been concerned with how and why populations are tracked, profiled, policed
and governed, as well as the ways in which those who are subjects of
surveillance manage, negotiate and resist these processes. As an
interdisciplinary field of study, surveillance studies is shaped by
questions that center on the management of everyday and exceptional life
– for example, queries relating to personal data, privacy, security, and
terrorism. We are excited to push the boundaries of these queries,
encouraging approaches to surveillance studies that consider the ways in
which surveillance processes are impacted by intersectional identity
markers such as gender, sexuality, ethnicity, socioeconomic status and
(dis)ability. We are also interested in the ways in which surveillance
studies can be methodologically or analytically impacted by adopting an
intersectional approach when conducting surveillance-related research.

The 2015 Workshop on Intersectional Approaches to Surveillance is guided by
the following question: *How can centering gender, sexuality, ethnicity,
race, dis/ability, socioeconomic status, religion, location and other
identity characteristics as categories of analysis help social theorists,
scholars and researchers to understand surveillance?* We seek papers that
explore the relationship between surveillance and configurations of these
identity markers, with an emphasis on those that theorize these identity
markers in an "interlocking", interconnected way. We are also interested
in papers that consider the methodological or analytical implications of
intersectional approaches to surveillance studies. Papers that critically
and creatively interrogate oppression, inequalities, discrimination, power
and resistance are particularly encouraged.

Confirmed attendees include:

Oscar Gandy, Shoshana Magnet, Simone Browne, and Kevin Walby.

*Submission Information*

Please submit 200 word abstracts and author name(s), university affiliation
and contact information via email to: *SSC.workshop@queensu.ca
<ssc.workshop@queensu.ca>*. Please put 2015 SSC Bi-Annual Workshop in
subject line.

*Abstract Submission Deadline*: *March 16th, 2015*

*Workshop Information*

The workshop will begin with welcoming remarks, a keynote speaker and
opening panel at 18:00 on Thursday 11 June. The keynote speaker will be Dr.
Oscar Gandy, followed by an opening panel who will consider the role of
intersectionality in surveillance studies and will also be available to
answer questions put forth by workshop participants. The workshop sessions
will run from 9:00 to 17:00 on Friday 12 June and Saturday 13 June. Paper
presentations will each be 15 minutes in length with an additional 10
minutes for questions. Following the final workshop session, a
dinner for all workshop participants will be held on Saturday, 13 June at
18:00.

*Fee/Accommodation*

Overnight accommodation is available in the Donald Gordon Centre and will
include breakfast, lunch and dinner for June 12, 13. Day attendees will
receive lunch and refreshments throughout each full day, as well as the
workshop dinner on June 13.

*Fees* Day attendees: $275 Overnight attendees: $550

*Any additional funding received by the workshop organizers will be used to
supplement registration and accommodation fees for graduate student
participants.*

Information will be listed on the Surveillance Studies Centre website as
available: www.sscqueens.org. Please email the conference organizers with
any questions at: ssc.workshop@queensu.ca.

Sincerely,

David Murakami Wood (Queen's University), Ciara Bracken-Roche (Queen's
University)

and Trevor Milford (Carleton University)

CFP - Consuming Intimacies: Bodies, Labour, Care, and Social Justice - Brock University, October 2015

The Social Justice Research Institute of Brock University, St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada, announces a call for papers and artistic contributions for an upcoming symposium (October 15–16, 2015)

Consuming Intimacies: Bodies, Labour, Care, and Social Justice

Intimacy, as a concept and as a set of practices, has a long-standing history in the study of families and kin relationships, friendships, sexualities, romantic partnerships, and the "sociology of personal life" (Gabb, 2008; Jamieson, 1998, Morgan, 2011; Smart, 2007). More recently, scholarly attention to intimacy has widened to embrace complex conceptual pairings with labour, economies, and social justice; these include, for example, studies on "intimate labours" (Boris & Parreñas, 2010), "intimate economies" (Wilson, 2012; Zelizer, 2005), "the commodification of intimate life" (Hochschild, 2013), and "body shopping" (Dickenson, 2008).

This two-day symposium aims to re-think concepts and practices of intimacy and social justice issues through a wide spectrum of twenty-first-century intimate labours and their associated economies. We envisage two interconnected streams for papers, artistic contributions, and discussions. While underpinned by diverse transdisciplinary approaches and problematics, these two streams share a focus on intimacies and embodiment; entanglements of care, work, consumption, and commodification; varied forms of "global-intimate pairings" (Wilson, 2012); gender, class, and racial inequalities; and attention to matters of epistemic justice and injustice.

The first stream focuses on intimate labours as "work that involves embodied and affective interactions in the service of social reproduction" (Boris & Parreñas, 2010, p. 7) and which entangle production, social reproduction, and consumption. These interactions include a wide array of paid and unpaid labours done mainly by women but increasingly by men, including new and reconfigured forms of intimate and commodified labours that have arisen in contexts of neoliberal restructuring and within "global care chains" (Hochschild, 2000), "care diamond(s)" (Raghuram 2012), and the "international division of reproductive labour" (Parreñas, 2000, 2012).

A second stream centres on intimate labours and their economies, including exchanges involving organs, body tissues, and body fluids (e.g., milk, sperm, blood, kidneys). These corporeal exchanges fuse intimacies and economies, serving to both reify and contest notions of altruism, exploitation, and commodification (Dickenson, 2007). This stream will interrogate how value is created in intimate labours and examine how these exchanges entail a "pushing back at the limits between production and social reproduction, production and consumption, production and circulation, to turn even the most intimate of bodily functions into exchangeable commodities and services" (Cooper & Waldby, 2014, p. 5).

These two symposium streams will engage critical social justice issues that arise from the melding of intimacy with labour, exchange, and commodification. What conceptual transformations emerge through these entanglements? What do these reconfigurations mean for re-thinking neighbouring concepts of care, social reproduction, work, bodies and embodiment, mobilities, modes of exchange, consumption, and subjectivities? How are new forms of embodied, intimate labours and exchanges governed? When, where, and why are forms of intimate labours and exchanges contentious (Hoeyer, 2013), exploitative (Dickenson, 2013), or "bioviolent" (Moniruzzaman, 2012), and for whom and with what effects and affects? What challenges arise for critical social justice scholarship and activism from these new conceptual syntheses? How are topics of embodied labour and exchange addressed in cultural productions? What new frameworks – theoretical, epistemological, ontological, and/or methodological – can assist us with making sense of these fusions of intimacy, commodification, bodies, labour, care, and social justice?

Keynote speakers for this symposium areDonna Dickenson (Emeritus Professor of Medical Ethics and Humanities at the University of London), Monir Moniruzzaman (Michigan State University), and Rhacel Salazar Parreñas (University of Southern California).

We encourage contributions from across the humanities and social sciences, as well as interventions from artists and activists. Submissions are invited on (but not limited to) the following themes:

Care, work, and consumption
Transnational care giving and care work
New and reconfigured forms of intimate labours
Queer intimacies and the queering of practices of care
Social reproduction and intimate labours
Commodification of intimate life
Commercialization and commodification of bodily exchanges
Assisted human reproduction
Organ demand, donation, and sale
Human tissue and fluids demand, donation, sale, and banking
Ontological, epistemological and methodological issues
Paper proposals of 300 to 500 words, accompanied by a short biography (100 words), should be submitted to consumingintimacies@gmail.com by April 1, 2015. We are also interested in artistic contributions for which an artist's statement of 300 to 500 words should be submitted along with a short biography (100 words) and any other relevant materials. Proposals will be peer-reviewed and only 15-20 participants will be selected. Adjudication results will be announced by April 15th. Draft papers are to be submitted by September 15th. The symposium will be held October 15–16, 2015. Travel and childcare subsidies may be available.

For further queries, please contact Dr. Robyn Lee at rlee2@brocku.ca or Professor Andrea Doucet at adoucet@brocku.ca. Papers will be considered for a special issue of the journal Studies in Social Justice, as well as for a possible second publication.

For more information visit www.consumingintimacies.com.

Robyn Lee
Brock University

Email: rlee2@brocku.ca
Visit the website at http://www.consumingintimacies.com

References

Boris, E., & Parreñas, R. S. (Eds.). (2010). Intimate labors: Cultures, technologies, and the politics of care. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.

Cooper, M., & Waldby, C. (2014). Clinical labor: Tissue donors and research subjects in the global bioeconomy. Durham, NC: Duke University Press.

Dickenson, D. (2007). Property in the body: Feminist perspectives. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

—. (2008). Body shopping: Converting body parts to profit. Oxford, UK: Oneworld.

—. (2013). Exploitation and choice in the global egg trade: Emotive terminology or necessary critique? In M. Goodwin (Ed.), The global body market: Altruism's limits (pp. 21–43). New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.

Gabb, J. (2008). Researching intimacy in families. Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan.

Hochschild, A. R. (2000). Global care chains and emotional surplus value. In W. Hutton & A. Giddens (Eds.), On the edge: Living with global capitalism (pp. 14–38). London, UK: Random House.

—. (2013). The outsourced self: What happens when we pay others to live our lives for us. New York, NY: Picador.

Hoeyer, K. (2013). Exchanging human bodily material: Rethinking bodies and markets. Basel, CH: Springer.

Jamieson, L. (1998). Intimacy: Personal relationships in modern societies. London, UK: Wiley.

Moniruzzaman, M. (2012). "Living Cadavers" in Bangladesh: Bioviolence in the human organ bazaar. Medical Anthropology Quarterly, 26(1): 69–91.

Morgan, D. J. H. (2011). Rethinking family practices. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

Parreñas, R. S. (2000). Migrant Filipina domestic workers and the international division of reproductive labour. Gender & Society, 14(4), 560–80.

—. (2012). The reproductive labour of migrant workers. Global Networks, 12(2), 269–275.

Raghuram, P. (2012). Global care, local configurations – challenges to conceptualizations of care. Global Networks, 12(2), 155–174.

Smart, C. (2007). Personal life. Cambridge, UK: Polity.

Wilson, A. (2012). Intimacy: A useful category of transnational analysis. In G. Pratt & V. Rosner (Eds.), The global and the intimate: Feminism in our time (pp. 31–56). New York, NY: Columbia University Press.

Zelizer, V. A. (2005). The purchase of intimacy. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

Australian National Conference (AAS) - December, 2015

AAS 2015 announcement

We are pleased to advise that the next Australian Anthropological
Society (AAS) conference will be hosted by The University of
Melbourne from 1-4 December, 2015.

The call for panels will open on 23 March, while the call for papers
will follow on 4 May.

We are thrilled to welcome Nancy Scheper-Hughes, Joel Robbins and
Akhil Gupta as keynotes addressing the conference theme:

Moral Horizons

Anthropology's emergence at the intersection between colonial
modernity and non-modern cultural traditions has always put it face
to face with moral questions unique to its field of study. The
various ways of negotiating the relation between cultural and moral
relativism is perhaps one of the most important. But there are many
others such as the morality of modernisation and capitalist
development, the morality of racial classification and the morality
of different forms of patriarchal domination. All are as the old as
the discipline itself and have given rise to a particularly
anthropological mode of confronting moral questions. While this
engagement with morality began timidly, it has continuously grown to
become far more explicit today. It can even be said that since the
turn of the century it is one of the growth areas of anthropological
research and reflection.

Today, anthropology's moral horizons are continuously expanding. This
expansion is related in part to the extension of the spaces of
anthropological research and the multiplicity of moral issues that
has arisen within them. These have not only grown geographically to
include the entirety of the globe, but have also come to include
non-spatially localised phenomena. Topics such as the intensification
and the opposition to neo-liberal globalisation, the spread of social
media, the internet and online social relations, the re-emergence of
national and international neo-colonial forms of interventionism, the
intersection of religion, anti-colonialism and terrorism, the
continuing rise of forced and non-forced migration, and the
ecological crisis all have widened the scope of anthropological
research while highlighting new moral questions and dilemmas.

At the same time the morality of ethnographic and anthropological
practices has itself become a wider and more intense space of
reflection. It has become so institutionally as the discipline
becomes entangled with the imperative of 'ethics clearance' that
faces all university research. It has become so theoretically amidst
an effervescence in ethnographically grounded philosophising. Last
but not least, it has also become so politically. The radical object
of anthropological attachment, and the bearer of 'the good',
continues to move between 'natives', 'colonised', 'exploited',
'oppressed', and 'excluded', all general categories that remain
signifiers of at least one dimension of the lives of a variety of
populations. There is, however, an increased acceptance, such as with
indigenous governance, that contrary to what radical anthropologists
like to believe, the category of the good can be located even if
ambivalently among 'investors', and 'bureaucrats', etc.

The conference theme is an invitation for ethnographic research and
anthropological theorisations that can contribute, critically or
otherwise, to widen and multiply those moral horizons.

We seek papers from all the domains of anthropological research:
social, cultural, political and economic that directly or indirectly
relate to the above themes raising questions such as:

How do moral discourses shape social life in various ethnographic
contexts from formal politics and activism to everyday practices of
class and gender making?
Are moral judgements at the heart of all social distinctions?
Are political values being replaced by moral ones in a post-political
age? Should this make us wary of an increasing anthropological
interest in morality?
Is a moral anthropology an applied anthropology, an engaged
anthropology or development studies?
Do we need new ways of considering ethical research beyond the
strictures of the university ethics committee?
Is anthropology conceived as a moral project a departure from a
commitment to cultural relativism?
Do changes in university funding systems and opportunities for
employment have moral implications for anthropological teaching?

With best wishes on behalf of the conference committee,

Catie.

Dr Catie Gressier | Anthropology
School of Social and Political Sciences | Faculty of Arts
University of Melbourne | Vic 3010

Rm G7A, John Medley Building West |
W: http://ssps.unimelb.edu.au/about/staff/profiles/catie_gressier
T: (613) 9035 9881

Call for Papers - University of Toronto Quarterly

Call for Papers - University of Toronto Quarterly

http://bit.ly/utqcfp15

Acclaimed as one of the finest journals focused on the humanities, the University of Toronto Quarterly(UTQ) publishes interdisciplinary articles and review essays of international repute. This interdisciplinary approach provides a depth and quality to the journal that attracts both general readers and specialists from across the humanities.

The University of Toronto Quarterly welcomes contributions in all areas of the humanities – literature, philosophy, fine arts, music, the history of ideas, cultural studies, and so on. It favours articles that appeal to a scholarly readership beyond the specialists in the field of the given submission.

UTQ is especially interested in submissions for special issues or special sections on the following topics:

- Representations of urban life in Canada

- Literature and the media in an age of global fear (terrorism, environmental disaster, economic crisis)

- The return of formalism in literary studies

- Religion and secularism

- The state of the humanities in Canada

Submissions should be no more than 10,000 words inclusive of notes and works cited. Submissions should be sent in either Microsoft Word DOC or RTF format to utq@chass.utoronto.ca.

For more information on UTQ's house style and editorial policies, please see here - http://bit.ly/utqsubmissions - or visit the journal's website: www.utpjournals.com/utq

University of Toronto Press Journals Division
5201 Dufferin St., Toronto, ON Canada M3H 5T8
Tel: (416) 667-7810 Fax: (416) 667-7881

Email: utq@chass.utoronto.ca
Visit the website at http://www.utpjournals.com/utq

CFP: Canada in the Americas CSN-REC/MISC Conference - October 2015, McGill University

*Proposals are invited for a interdisciplinary conference, **Canada in the
Americas**, to be held October 2 and 3 at McGill University in Montreal,
Quebec.*
Papers should address the relationships of Canada to those spaces and
territories normally considered as belonging to Latin or South America and
the Caribbean. Possible topics include the flow of cultural influences and
artefacts between Canada and other regions in the Americas, patterns of
North-South migration, Indigenous struggles at the international level, the
status of diasporic populations within Canada, the emergence of regional or
subnational identities, the effects of hemispheric economic arrangements,
and other topics related to the conference theme. This is a suggested and
not exclusive list of topics for which proposals will be welcome. Papers
are invited from a variety of perspectives within the social sciences and
humanities.
Interested participants are welcome, as well, to submit proposals for
fully-formed panels of no more than three speakers (with a Chair and, if
desired, a respondent).
Proposals should be submitted (and papers may be presented) in either
English or French. Please send all proposals (200 words) by April 30, 2015
to misc.iecm@mcgill.ca
This conference will include the annual meeting of the *Canadian Studies
Network/Reseau d'études canadiennes* and is
organized and hosted by the McGill Institute for the Study of Canada under
its *Canada in the Americas Initiative *in partnership with the Département
d'études anglaises, Université de Montréal. Normally, participants will be
expected to cover their own costs of participation.

 

Call for Papers: Landscapes, sociality and materiality: Biennal Conference of the Finnish Anthropological Society - October 2015

Call for Papers: Landscapes, sociality and materiality: Biennal
Conference of the Finnish Anthropological Society
October 21-22, 2015

Dear all,
The Call for papers for the conference of the Finnish Anthropological
Society (21.-22.10.2015) is on. Below is the address of the
conference website containing the CfP and the list of panels.

The keynote speaker for the conference is Anna Tsing and the
Westermarck lecture is to be given by Philippe Descola. On Friday the
23th of October there will be an "Anthropological knots" symposium
with a separate program published later.

http://www.antropologinenseura.fi/en/events/anthropology-conference-2015/

On behalf of the organizers,
Tuomas Tammisto

CFP: ESFO conference - June 2015, Brussels

ESFO conference: Call for paper session 16

Dear colleagues,

The next ESfO (European Society for Oceanists) conference is
scheduled for 24-27 June 2015 in Brussels. The call for papers is
now open.

We are looking forward to hearing from people interested in the
following topic: "Relating subsistence agriculture with
socio-environmental mutations in Oceania" (session 16)

To read the abstract and submit a proposal by 1 March 2015, please
visit this webpage:
http://www.pacific-studies.net/conferences/public.php?confID=1&action=session_detail&session=17
>>
>> To submit a proposal, you first need to open an account and log in
through the members' corner of http://www.pacific-studies.net.Your
proposal should include your name, affiliation, a title and an
abstract that should not exceed 250 words.

For more general information about the ESfO conference and the call
for papers, see
http://www.pacific-studies.net/conferences/public.php?confID=1

We are looking forward to reading your proposals.
Best regards
Sophie Caillon & Maëlle Calandra

Maëlle CALANDRA
Doctorante en anthropologie / Allocataire
Représentante des étudiants

École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales (EHESS) CREDO (UMR 7308)
AMU-CNRS-EHESS
Centre de Recherche et de Documentation sur l'Océanie
Maison Asie Pacifique
Aix Marseille Université
3, place Victor Hugo13003 Marseille - FRANCE

http://www.pacific-credo.net/index.php?page=maelle-calandra
http://ehess.academia.edu/Ma%C3%ABlleCalandra

CFP - Contours of Violence, South African Sociological Association Congress - June/July 2015

Call for Papers-Contours of Violence

XXII South African Sociological Association Congress

University of Johannesburg, June 28th – July 1st 2015

Incorporating the Interim Conference of ISA Research Committee 46 (Clinical Sociology)

Keynote speaker:

Prof Maggie Abraham, Professor of Sociology & President of the ISA, Hofstra University, New York, USA

SECOND CALL FOR PAPERS

How do we open up the question of violence? What are its contours? How are we to understand the relation between every day, insidious and sometimes invisible forms of violence and violation, on the one hand, and its spectacular and grotesque counterparts, such as war and genocide, on the other? Are there productive entry points for understanding contemporary forms of violence and the impact thereof on subjectivities, social forms and the social lives and fabric of societies, communities and families? What are the cross-generational legacies and traces of violent and traumatic experiences? What is at stake in asking questions about 'excess' in relation to the use of force and repertoires of violence? Likewise, what intellectual and political risks are attached to accounts of violence that understand it in terms of individual and collective states of rage, shame and revenge, as 'madness,' or as rational and effective, respectively? What are the strategies and tactics deployed by various kinds of social actors to negotiate and mediate the risk of violence in everyday life? What is the boundary and division between violence and non-violence conceptually, in global and local mappings, and in the accounts of violent subjects and the subjects of violence?

This congress explores the possibilities of using the analytic category of violence – understood in its narrow sense as physical force associated with injury, infringement or transgression and therefore as potentially life-threatening, but also in its broader usage – to map and illuminate the contemporary social order and to refract or recast key questions and concerns related to the making and shaping of the democratic South African body politic.

Arguably, conceptualisations of the notion of violence – be it physical, structural, discursive or symbolic – have been a central part of the vocabulary that sociologists deploy in order to describe or account for phenomena and experiences such as poverty, inequality, gender relations, and social welfare provision. Yet, the opportunity for a sustained conversation that places the notion of violence at the centre of social analysis does not often arise, in part perhaps because the topic seems to be located outside or on the boundary of the disciplinary scope and corpus. Whilst the concept has been used in multiple, sometimes loose and often overlapping ways in scholarly work, there is some consensus that understandings of violence and the theoretical registers associated with it are normatively ambiguous and conceptually slippery and multifaceted. This complexity is apparent, for example, in the way that violence may be conceived as a force of oppression, a counter-hegemonic strategy, and a mechanism that maintains the status quo. It is used at times to symbolise moral impropriety in actions and policies or to signal emancipation, resistance, and revolution. It may be understood as the state of exception, or seen as normalised in the structures of political, economic and family relationships and yet demonised when enacted during turbulent times. Violence is often overt and direct. Yet, violence is also understood to be operating in symbolic and hidden ways in order to oppress; directly or indirectly; explicitly or subtly.

Setting out to trace contours of violence in a historically situated South African context gives rise to a further set of concerns and caveats. Indeed, there are several ways in which we might 'think', but also 'unthink', violence in South Africa. How do we treat violence as a manifestation of the present, without rendering it 'new' and 'now'? How do we reflect histories of violence without reducing them to mere explanations for an apparently contemporary phenomenon? How do we understand violence as physical, bodily, and intimate and also hold the concept to account for other kinds of impersonal, destructive domination: structural, slow, and even epistemic violence? Moreover, is violence always socially destructive, or can violence be socially purposeful and productive? What are the ethical stakes of asking such a question? Or, put differently, what would it mean to sociologically study violence out of a commitment to social justice, while remaining aware of the risks of scholarly moralism? How might sociologists conceptualise violence both within, but perhaps also outside, of the categories within which violence itself works (e.g. 'gender-based violence', 'violence against foreigners'). How might we take seriously the forms of violence enacted not only by some categories of people against other categories of people, but by the state, by corporations, etc.?

In order to explore these questions, we are inviting papers that empirically and theoretically engage the question of violence. In particular, work that assist in mapping out and critically engaging the bodies of literature and theoretical vocabularies currently available to us to help make sense of the range of phenomena that we term violence are welcomed. Likewise, we are interested in ways of thinking through the limits of particular conceptual registers as well as the kinds of interdisciplinary conversations that are possibly necessary in order to be able to account more satisfactorily for the dynamics of violence in South Africa, its local, global and historical sources and its articulation across modalities and scales. Exploring questions of violence also necessitates a robust engagement with social justice interventions aimed at addressing pernicious forms and manifestations of violence; from the level of the state, to community, civil society organisations, and scholars

.

Local Organising Committee: Tina Uys (Chair), Kezia Batisai, Tapiwa Chagonda, David du Toit, Anthony Kaziboni, Grace Khunou, Kammila Naidoo, Pragna Rugunanan, Heidi Scheepers, Anton Senekal, Luke Sinwell, Muhammed Suleman.

Email address: sasa2015@uj.ac.za

Abstract deadline: 2 March 2015

Abstract submission process: Abstracts should be submitted on-line at www.sasaonline.org.za/abstracts.

You should also e-mail your abstract to the relevant Working Group Convenor. A list of the details of the Working Group Convenors is available at http://www.sasaonline.org.za/working-groups.html.

Book proposals sought for Routledge Innovative Ethnographies series

Dear colleagues,


with apologies apologies for wide the cross-posting, I am renewing an earlier CALL FOR BOOK PROPOSALS for the Routledge Innovative Ethnographies series: http://www.innovativeethnographies.net/

At this moment in time the publisher and I are particularly looking for visual ethnographies (either making use of photography or video).

Series description:
No longer unsecure about their aesthetic sensibilities, contemporary ethnographers have expanded upon the established tradition of impressionistic and confessional fieldwork to produce works that not only stimulate the intellect, but that also delight the senses. From visual to reflexive ethnography, from narrative to arts-based inquiry, from hypertext to multimodal scholarship, and from autoethnography to performance ethnography, fieldwork has undergone a revolution in data collection practice and strategies of representation and dissemination. Innovative ethnography is a catalytic field of experimentation and reflection, innovation and revelation, transformation and call to action. The new Routledge Innovative Ethnographies book series publishes fieldwork that appeals to new and traditional audiences of scholarly research through the use of new media and new genres. Combining the BOOK and MULTIMEDIA material hosted on the series website, this series challenges the boundaries between ethnography and documentary journalism, between the scholarly essay and the novel, between academia and drama. From the use of narrative and drama to the use of reflexivity and pathos, from the contextualization of ethnographic documentation in felt textures of place to the employment of artistic conventions for the sake of good writing, this series entertains, enlightens, and educates.

Series editor: Phillip Vannini, Royal Roads University, Canada
For questions about proposal submission contact: phillip.vannini@royalroads.ca but before doing so please first *carefully* consult http://www.innovativeethnographies.net/submission-guidelines

Thank you.
p.

Phillip Vannini
Professor and Canada Research Chair
Royal Roads University
www.publicethnography.net

Sex/Gender Interdisciplinary Conference - FPR-UCLA (October 2015)

FPR-UCLA Interdisciplinary Conference on Sex/Gender (October 23-24, 2015)

6th FPR-UCLA Interdisciplinary Conference
A Critical Moment: Sex/Gender Research at the Intersection of
Culture, Brain, & Behavior
October 23-24, 2015
UCLA, Los Angeles, California

WEBSITES:
http://www.thefpr.org/conference2015/
http://www.thefprconference2015.org

This conference occurs at a critical juncture in sex/gender research
in neuroscience, anthropology, psychology, and related disciplines.
New theories are utilizing a conception of the brain as dynamic,
plastic, and adaptable, and of sex/gender brain and behavioral
differences as subject to the influence of a broad range of
biological, cultural, and social or environmental factors.

In organizing this conference, our aim is to bring the neuro- and
social sciences together to consider three cross-cutting questions on
sex/gender: why now? what's fixed/changing/changeable? what's at
stake?

REGISTER NOW:
http://www.thefpr.org/conference2015/registration.php

CONFIRMED PARTICIPANTS
Sari van Anders, Arthur Arnold, Tom Boellstorff, Lisa Diamond, Anne
Fausto-Sterling, Daniel Fessler, Matthew Gutmann, Gilbert Herdt,
Melissa Hines, Kathy Huang, Marcia Inhorn, Hillard Kaplan, Robert
Lemelson, Michael Peletz, Donald Pfaff, Sarah Richardson, James
Rilling, Alice Wexler, Carol Worthman

CFP: From Possibility to Practice in Aging, Canadian Association on Gerontology (CAG) Conference, October 2015, Calgary

From Possibility to Practice in Aging, Canadian Association on Gerontology (CAG) Conference, October 23-25, 2015, Calgary

Deadline: April 15, 2015

http://cag2015.ca/submissions/abstracts/

 

CFP: Exchanges about Discovery and Exploration - Terrae Incognitae

CALL FOR PAPERS: EXCHANGES ABOUT DISCOVERY AND EXPLORATION

Terrae Incognitae

For more information:

CFP Terrae Incognitae

CFP: Dressing Global Bodies: Clothing Cultures, Politics and Economies in Globalizing Eras, c. 1600s-1900s - July 2016, University of Alberta

Dressing Global Bodies:

Clothing Cultures, Politics and Economies in Globalizing Eras, c. 1600s-1900s

7-9 July 2016, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada

Co-Organized with the Pasold Research Fund, UK

Read more ...

Conference Of The African Studies Association Of Africa, Oct 2015

First International Conference Of The African Studies Association Of Africa, ASAA

OCTOBER 13-17, 2015

At The Institute Of African Studies, University Of Ibadan, Nigeria Theme: "African Studies In The Twenty-First Century: Past, Present, And Future."Call For Abstracts, Papers And Panel Proposals

Read more ...

CFP: Community, Empowerment & Leadership in Black Canada - Black Canadian Studies Association Conference - Dalhousie University, May 2015

CALL FOR PAPERS

The 2nd Biennial Black Canadian Studies Association ConferenceCOMMUNITY, EMPOWERMENT & LEADERSHIPIN BLACK CANADA

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CFP: Facing the Challenges of Aging and Dying (an interdisciplinary conference) - Queen’s University, October 2015

Facing the Challenges of Aging and Dying (an interdisciplinary conference)

CALL FOR PAPERS

An interdisciplinary conference on Facing the Challenges of Aging and Dying

(Oct. 16-18, 2015) Queen's University CANADA

Read more ...

Journal for Undergraduate Ethnography - New Issue and CFP

Dear friends and colleagues,

We are excited to announce that the newest issue of *The Journal for
Undergraduate Ethnography * (JUE)
is now available.

Read more ...

CFP: What Can a Feminist Geopolitics Do? RGS/IBG Conference, Exeter - September 2015

*Call for papers: RGS-IBG Annual International Conference, Exeter, 1-4Sept 2015*

*What Can a Feminist Geopolitics Do?*

Read more ...

GENDER RELATIONS AND RISING INEQUALITY - CALL FOR PAPERS (July 2015)

Dear colleagues,

The increasing evidence for rising inequalities across developing anddeveloped countries has left us with a deepening concern about where thisleaves gender relations, with new questions about directions of change andthe new forms that gender inequalities may take in the years to come, andthe challenges this will pose for development and social justice. It feelslike an important moment for gender analysts to take stock and to lookforward.

Read more ...

CFP - Religion, Science and the Future - Florida, January 2016

CFP - "Religion, Science and the Future"
A Conference Sponsored by the

The International Society for the Study of Religion, Nature and Culture∗

Celebrating the 10th Anniversary

14 – 17 January 2016

Read more ...

FPR-UCLA Interdisciplinary Conference on Sex/Gender (October 2015)

FPR-UCLA Interdisciplinary Conference on Sex/Gender (October 23-24, 2015)

6th FPR-UCLA Interdisciplinary Conference
A Critical Moment: Sex/Gender Research at the Intersection of
Culture, Brain, & Behavior
October 23-24, 2015
UCLA, Los Angeles, California

Read more ...

Eleventh Conference on Hunting and Gathering Societies (CHAGS 11) - Vienna, September 2015

Eleventh Conference on Hunting and Gathering Societies (CHAGS 11)

The Eleventh Conference on Hunting and Gathering Societies (CHAGS 11) will be taking place in Vienna from September 7-11, 2015.
We are pleased to announce the Call for Papers (deadline: February 20, 2015). You can find all relevant information on the CHAGS 11 homepage.

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CFP: SANA 2015, April 16-18; John Jay (CUNY), NYC

Call for participants for a track within the Society for the Anthropology ofNorth America conference @ John Jay (CUNY), NYC. This is one of fourpossible tracks participants can submit papers/proposals to. Full detailson the SANA web page (URL below). Take a read below and on the web site.Send me a note if you have questions about the specific track. Submitsomething directly to the conference: it should be a great event!

Read more ...

Conference - Transnational Hispaniola: Theories Into Practices - Haiti - October 2015

Submission - Conference - Transnational Hispaniola: Theories Into
Practices - Haiti - October 2015 - Deadline: January 31, 2015*

Please find the CFP for the Transnational Hispaniola Conference, scheduled
for October 2015 in Port-au-Prince, Haiti.
*TRANSNATIONAL** HISPANIOLA III:*
*THEORIES INTO PRACTICES*
PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI, OCTOBER 2015
*Colloquium Theme:*

Read more ...

Shallow Pasts, Endless Horizons: Sustainability & Archaeology, 48th Annual Chacmool Conference, November 2015, University of Calgary

Shallow Pasts, Endless Horizons: Sustainability & Archaeology, 48th Annual Chacmool Conference, November 11-14, 2015, University of Calgary

Deadline: March 30, 2015

https://antharky.ucalgary.ca/chacmool2015/

 

Migration and Late Capitalism: Critical Intersections with the Asia-Pacific and Beyond, June 2015, University of Victoria

Migration and Late Capitalism: Critical Intersections with the Asia-Pacific and Beyond, June 11–13, 2015, University of Victoria

Deadline: February 27, 2015

http://bit.ly/1Aa8RQ8

Call for papers - Indigenous Politics in Comparative Perspective ECPR - Montreal 2015

Call for papers: Indigenous politics in comparative perspective - sectionfor the 2015 ECPR general conference, Montreal, August 2015.http://ecpr.eu/Events/SectionDetails.aspx?SectionID=409&EventID=94

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Call for Papers: Second Biennial Black Canadian Studies Association Conference - May 2015, Dalhousie University

The Biennial Black Canadian Studies Association Conference presents:
"Community, Empowerment & Leadership in Black Canada"

The conference will take place from 21 to 24 May 2015 at the Dalhousie
University Law School (Schulich School of Law).

Read more ...

CFP - Friction-less and Root-less Mobilities? Opportunities, Barriers and Intimacies in Expatriate Migration - Geneva, June 2015

CFP - Friction-less and Root-less Mobilities? Opportunities, Barriers and Intimacies in Expatriate Migration

Call for Papers

Friction-less and Root-less Mobilities?
Opportunities, Barriers and Intimacies in Expatriate Migration

A panel of IMISCOE 12th ANNUAL CONFERENCE

NCCR – On the Move 1st Annual Conference

"Right, Democracy and Migration – Challenges and Opportunities"

Geneva, 25-27 June 2015

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CFP: Rural Transformations and Food Systems - BRICs and Agrarian Change in the Global South

Call for papers: Rural Transformations and Food Systems - BRICs and Agrarian Change in the Global South

20-21 April 2015

Cape Town South Africa

Read more ...

Call for Proposals 10th Annual Assembly of the Canadian Association for Food Studies, Ottawa, 2015

Call for Proposals 10th Annual Assembly of the Canadian Association for Food Studies: Capital Ideas: Nourishing Debates, Minds and Bodies
May 30 – June 2, 2015, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario

To encourage collaboration and to better reflect the broad range of important work happening in this field, we encourage academics and other researchers to submit proposals for any of the following formats, (see below for descriptions of each)

Read more ...

2015 UCLA Gender Interdisciplinary Conference

Registration Open - 6th FPR-UCLA Interdisciplinary Conference
October 23-24, 2015
UCLA, Los Angeles, CA
http://thefpr.org/conference2015/

Read more ...

SIEF2015 12th Congress CfP - Zagreb, Croatia, June 2015

SIEF2015 12th Congress CfP:

http://www.siefhome.org/congresses/sief2015/

Utopias, Realities, Heritages. Ethnographies for the 21st century

Zagreb, Croatia. 21-25 June 2015

Call for papers, workshop contributions, films and posters

CFP: The Swedish Anthropological Association annual meeting/conference - Lund University, Sweden, April 2015

The Swedish Anthropological Association annual meeting/conference CfPanels and CfPapers:

http://sverigesantropologforbund.org/sant-2015-lund-do-the-right-thing/

Do the right thing! Anthropology and Morality
Lund University, Sweden, April 17-19 2015

Deadline 18 January 2015.

Migration Conference in Victoria – CALL FOR PAPERS, June 2015

CALL FOR PAPERS

Migration and Late Capitalism:
Critical Intersections with the Asia-Pacific and Beyond

June 11 – 13, 2015
University of Victoria, BC, Canada

Read more ...

Call for Papers - European Conference on African Studies (Paris)

Call for Papers - European Conference on African Studies (Paris)

The Sixth European Conference on African Studies (ECAS-6) will take place in Paris 8-10 July 2015 at the Sorbonne.

The co-organisers are IMAF (Institut des mondes africains) and LAM (Les Afriques dans le monde).

The principal theme of ECAS 6 is Collective Mobilisations in Africa: Contestation, Resistance, Revolt. This theme, however, is not exclusive. The scientific committee will also consider panel proposals on other themes, associated with emergent and more classical fields of study alike.

Deadline for submitting paper proposals: January 9, 2015

For information on how to submit papers, please go to :http://www.ecas2015.fr/

CFP: Controlling Sexuality and Reproduction, Past and Present, August 2015, University of Lethbridge

Controlling Sexuality and Reproduction, Past and Present, August 12-14, 2015, University of Lethbridge

Deadline: February 15, 2015

https://www.uleth.ca/conreg/controlling-sexuality/call-for-papers

Historical transitions: Rhythms, Crises, and Legacies, Maison Archéologie & Ethnologie (MAE) Conference, June 2015

Historical transitions: Rhythms, Crises, and Legacies, Maison Archéologie & Ethnologie (MAE) Conference, June 10-12, 2015

Deadline: January 15, 2015

http://bit.ly/1yhk8f1

CFP: Unsettling Colonial Modernity: Islamicate Contexts in Focus, April 2015, University of Alberta

Unsettling Colonial Modernity: Islamicate Contexts in Focus

University of Alberta
April 24-25, 2015

Keynote speakers: Dr. Sherene Razack*, Dr. Parin Dossa*

Submission Deadline: Dec. 15, 2014

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CfP: The Finnish Anthropological Society_ Annual Conference

Suomen Antropologinen Seura
The Finnish Anthropological Society

Suomen Antropologisen Seuran Antropologipäivät 2015:
Maisema, sosiaalisuus ja materiaalisuus
Helsinki, 21.–22. lokakuuta 2015

(Scroll down for English version)

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Call for Applications – Future Earth Young Scientist Networking Conference 2015

Early Career Scientists are invited to submit applications to participate in next year's Future Earth Young Scientist Networking Conference on Integrated Science.

The Future Earth Young Scientists Networking Conference on Integrated Science discussing the theme of "Future Sustainability — the role of Science in the SDGs" will take place at Villa Vigoni, the German-Italian Centre for Cultural and Scientific Exchange at Lake Como in Italy, from 24-30 May, 2015.

The International Social Science Council (ISSC), International Council for Science (ICSU), the German Research Foundation (DFG) are inviting applications for participation by early career scientists.

Closing date for applications: December 22, 2014.

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Colloque Nouvelles perspectives en études féministes. Littérature, cinéma et théâtre - août 2015

Colloque Nouvelles perspectives en études féministes. Littérature, cinéma
et théâtre - août 2015

Colloque Nouvelles perspectives en études féministes. Littérature, cinéma
et théâtre

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Appel à communication / Call for proposals – Résister en corps / Bodily Resistance

**new deadline for submissions is 6/02/2015 (February 6, 2015)

**étendre de la date limite de soumission des résumés au 6 février, 2015

(en français et en anglais) 

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CFP: NACS-XI 2015 - A Land Shaped by Water: Perspectives on Canada Turku, Finland, August 2015

CALL FOR PAPERS: NACS-XI 2015

A Land Shaped by Water: Perspectives on Canada
Turku, Finland, Wed 12 – Sat 15 August 2015

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Appel à Communication. Colloque AMADES 2015 "Ce que guérir veut dire"

****Veuillez prendre note que la date limite de proposition des communications du prochain colloque organisé par l'Amades "Ce que guérir veut dire. Expériences, significations, politiques et technologies de la guérison" a été étendue au 8 janvier 2015.****

Cher(e)s collègues, Nous avons le plaisir de vous informer de la tenue du prochain colloque organisé par l'Amades du 27 au 29 mai 2015 à Marseille et à Ottawa ; ainsi qu'à Dakar (dont la date vous sera communiquée prochainement).Ce que guérir veut direExpériences, significations, politiques et technologies de la guérison
Appel à communication en fichier joint. Veuillez prendre note que la date limite de proposition des communications est fixée au 20 décembre 2014 à l'adresse suivante : guerir.sciencesconf.org
Toutes les informations, précisions et mises à jour concernant la programmation du colloque seront diffusées sur le site guerir.sciencesconf.org que nous vous invitons à consulter régulièrement.
Nous espérons que vous serez nombreux à y répondre et nous nous faisons une joie de vous accueillir sur l'un des trois sites du Colloque.

LINK

CFP: Women and Gender: Looking Toward 'Caribbeanness'

CFP: Women and Gender: Looking Toward 'Caribbeanness'

http://vc.bridgew.edu/jiws

Special Issue Call for Papers
Women and Gender: Looking Toward "Caribbeanness"

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9th European Feminist Research Conference -Sex & Capital, June 2015, Finland

The 9th European Feminist Research Conference
-Sex & Capital, 3-6 June, 2015
University of Lapland, Rovaniemi, Finland

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Indigenous Archives, Libraries, and Museums International Conference - Washington, DC, 2015

2015 International Conference of Indigenous Archives, Libraries, and Museums - Washington, DC

http://www.atalm.org/node/63

Dates: Key Dates and Deadlines.

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CFP: Sovereignties and Colonialisms: Resisting Racism, Extraction and Dispossession - April/May 2015, York University

CFP: Sovereignties and Colonialisms: Resisting Racism, Extraction and Dispossession, York University, 2015

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES 2015
Sovereignties and Colonialisms: Resisting Racism, Extraction and Dispossession

April 30-May 3, 2015

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CFP: Lusophone Studies Association Halifax Conference: June/July 2015, SMU, Halifax

Call for Papers – Lusophone Studies Association Halifax Conference
The Lusophone World in Progression: Historical Legacy, Transnationalism &
Development in Globalized Contexts

June 28-July 1, 2015, St. Mary's University, Halifax

Submission deadline: November 10, 2014

More information:

http://lsa.apps01.yorku.ca/2014/10/call-for-papers-lusophone-studies-association-halifax-conference/

CFP: Canadian Women's Studies Association/L'association Canadienne Des Études Sur Les Femmes (Cwsa/Acef)- WGSRF Annual Conference- University of Ottawa- May/June 2015

Canadian Women's Studies Association/L'association Canadienne Des Études
Sur Les Femmes (Cwsa/Acef)- WGSRF Annual Conference- University of Ottawa-
May 30 – June 2, 2015

CFP Deadline: December 12 2014

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SANA 2015 Conference: Call for Track Proposals (Inequality, Equality and Difference)

SANA 2015 Conference

Call for Track Proposals: Inequality, Equality, and Difference

Proposals due November 14, 2014

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Graduate Student Conference- Changing Asia in the Globalizing World: Boundaries, Identity and Transnationalism - May 2015, York University - Glendon

Proposal- Graduate Student Conference- Changing Asia in the Globalizing
World: Boundaries, Identity and Transnationalism- Deadline: November 1, 2014

The York Centre for Asian Research (YCAR) is calling for proposals for its
third international graduate student conference, Changing Asia in the
Globalizing World: Boundaries, Identity and Transnationalism, being held
May 1 and 2, 2015, at York University's Glendon campus.

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New Narratives of the Postcolonial Arctic- Organised by Arctic Encounters – Contemporary Travel/Writing in the European High North (ENCARC): May 2015, Roskilde University

New Narratives of the Postcolonial Arctic- Organised by Arctic Encounters – Contemporary Travel/Writing in the European High North (ENCARC)- Roskilde University, May 27-29, 2015

CFP Deadline: December 1 2014

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Colloque: Dans leurs propres mots: la mobilité dans les écrits personnels et les sources orales, 14e-21e siècles

Colloque Dans leurs propres mots: la mobilité dans les écrits personnels et
les sources orales, 14e-21e siècles

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CINSA 2015: Survivance & Reconciliation: 7 Forward / 7 Back - June 2015, Concordia University

Call for Papers/Proposals:

CINSA 2015: Survivance & Reconciliation: 7 Forward / 7 Back
Date: 11-13 June 2015 at Concordia University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

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Xavier Dolan, Queer Nations, and World Cinema: Locating the Intimate within the Global

Xavier Dolan, Queer Nations, and World Cinema: Locating the Intimate within
the Global

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Artifacts in Agraria Symposium: University of Guelph, October 2015

Artifacts in Agraria Symposium: University of Guelph, Ontario, Canada,
17-18 October 2015

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Eighth Annual International Festival of Anthropology Film: Work and Solidarity

Call for submissions.

The film committee of the Ethnographic Film Unit @ UBC invites film
submissions that explore notions of work and social solidarity. All aspects
of work ­ paid/unpaid; creative, productive, intangible ­ are considered.
What we are most interested in are films that find ways that illuminate
solidarity and dignity in and through work

Early Submission Deadline: Jan. 16, 2015. Final deadline: Feb. 20, 2015.
Festival, May 2015.

Details and submission form and info:
http://anthfilm.anth.ubc.ca/events.html

CFP: Changing Asia in the Globalizing World: Boundaries, Identity, and Transnationalism, May 2015, York University

Changing Asia in the Globalizing World: Boundaries, Identity, and Transnationalism, May 1-2, 2015, York University

Deadline: November 1, 2014

http://bit.ly/Zt2Dy3

APPEL DE COMMUNICATION Paroles et regards de femmes en Acadie. D’hier à aujourd’hui

Un appel de communication est lancé pour le colloque pluridisciplinaire « Paroles et regards de femmes en Acadie. D'hier à aujourd'hui », qui aura lieu à l'Université Sainte-Anne, Pointe-de-l'Église, du 5 au 7 novembre 2015.

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Call for panels for Association of Social Anthropologists annual conference, Exeter, April 2015

The call for panels for the Association of Social Anthropologists' annual conference is now open. The conference will take place from 13 to 16 April 2015, at the University of Exeter.

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Call for Chapter Contributions: Intimate Economies: Bodies, Emotions and Sexualities on the Global Market

CALL FOR BOOK CHAPTER CONTRIBUTIONS
Intimate Economies: Bodies, Emotions and Sexualities on the Global Market
Edited by Susanne Hofmann and Adi Moreno

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Call for papers - Association Française d'Ethnologie et d'Anthropologie (Toulouse, June 29th to July 2nd, 2015)

Call for papers - Association Française d'Ethnologie et d'Anthropologie (Toulouse, June 29th to July 2nd, 2015).

The theme is: Beyond Measure - Excessiveness and Creativity

The deadline for proposals is: 15 October 2014.

The information is available in French and English at: http://demesure.sciencesconf.org/

Call for Papers for Panel: Precarious Youth? Prevaricating Ethics? Producing Knowledge with/about Young Populations - LASA, May 2015

LASA Conference
May 2015, Puerto Rico
Co-­‐Organizers,
Susan Frohlick (University of Manitoba)
and
Mauricio Lopez-­‐Ruiz(University of Costa Rica)

Call for Papers for Panel:
Precarious Youth? Prevaricating Ethics? Producing
Knowledge with/about Young Populations

For more information:

 CFP-LASA

Call for papers for panel: Precarious Youth? Prevaricating Ethics? Producing Knowledge with/about Young Populations - LASA Conference May 2015, Puerto Rico

LASA Conference May 2015, Puerto Rico

Call for papers for panel: Precarious Youth? Prevaricating Ethics? Producing Knowledge with/about Young Populations

Co-­Organizers, Susan Frohlick (University of Manitoba)and Mauricio Lopez-Ruiz(University of Costa Rica)

For more information:

CFP

Call for Papers -- Archivaria 40th Anniversary Issue

Call for Papers for a 40th Anniversary Issue of Archivaria (Fall 2015)

Archivaria Anniversary Issue: To Understand Ourselves

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CFP: 2nd BIENNIAL BLACK CANADIAN STUDIES ASSOCIATION CONFERENCE - COMMUNITY, EMPOWERMENT & LEADERSHIP IN BLACK CANADA, May 2015, Dalhousie University

*-CALL FOR PAPERS – *

*2nd BIENNIAL BLACK CANADIAN STUDIES ASSOCIATION CONFERENCE*

*presents*

*COMMUNITY, EMPOWERMENT & LEADERSHIP IN BLACK CANADA*

*21-24 May 2015*

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CFP - Conference of Historical Geographers, July 2015

Call for Papers, International Conference of Historical
Geographers, London, 5-10 July 2015

Call for Papers, International Conference of Historical Geographers,
London, 5-10 July 2015
UNDER ITS OWN NAME? FEMINIST HISTORICAL GEOGRAPHY 2015

Organizers:

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Archaeology 2015 :Ancient Cultures Clash in the Lands of the Bible

Announcement and invitation

To the International Conference on

Archaeology 2015Ancient Cultures in the Lands of the Bible

(Jerusalem, June 2015)

And call for Abstracts: The scientific committee of the conference invites
experts to submit abstracts on the conference topics. The list of topics is
presented on the conference web-site:

http://www.archeologyisrael.com/index.php?page_id=18

More details on the conference are available on the site.
For questions contact desk@archaeologyisrael.com

Food and Sustainability: Towards a Culinary Ecology

Food and Sustainability: Towards a Culinary Ecology

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Contact Info

Canadian Anthropology Society (CASCA)
c/o Karli Whitmore
125 rue Jean de la Londe, #301
Baie d'Urfe (Québec) H9X 3T8
Email