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2023

CASCA Awards for Teaching Excellence (CATE)

Instructor

Karl Schmid

Faculty

Liesl Gambold

The Labrecque-Lee Book Prize

Yana Stainova, assistant professor at McMaster University

Sonorous Worlds: Musical Enchantment In Venezuela. University of Michigan Press

CASCA Fellows

Michael Lambek

Susan Vincent

Outstanding Graduating Anthropology Student Awards

Bachelor’s Awards

  • Grayson Thate, Athabasca University
  • Cassandra Sundin, Saint Mary’s University
  • Devin Kyle, University of Saskatchewan
  • Althea Pilapil, Dalhousie University
  • Gabriel Jamieson, Simon Fraser University
  • Paige Leslie, University of Victoria
  • Makenna Mestinsek, Saint Francis Xavier University
  • Sonya Prasad, University of British Columbia
  • Pengpeng Chen, University of British Columbia
  • Alex DiGiovannantonio, Mount Royal University
  • Alyanna Denise Chua, University of Toronto Scarborough
  • Leann Ling, University of Toronto Mississauga
  • Iakoiewáhtha Patton, University of Toronto St. George
  • Paula Rodrigo, Carleton University
  • Anna Haglund, University of British Columbia – Okanagan

Master’s Awards

  • Jenny Reich, Dalhousie University
  • Jessica Jack, University of Saskatchewan
  • Jennifer Argan, University of Victoria
  • Sophia Champion, University of Toronto
  • Emma Jing Li, University of British Columbia
  • Sonya Gray, Carleton University
  • Madelaine Lekei, University of British Columbia – Okanagan

PhD Awards

  • Bryce Anderson, Dalhousie University
  • George Mantzios, University of Toronto
  • Cassandre Campeau-Bouthillier, University of Victoria
  • Patrick Morgan Ritchie, University of British Columbia
  • Justin Raycraft, McGill University
  • Kirsten Francescone, Carleton University

Weaver-Tremblay Award

Colin Scott

Salisbury Award

Alice Miot-Bruneau

2022

CASCA Awards for Teaching Excellence (CATE)

Instructor

Megan Graham

Faculty

Mélissa Gauthier

The Labrecque-Lee Book Prize

Yana Stainova, assistant professor at McMaster University

Sonorous Worlds: Musical Enchantment In Venezuela. University of Michigan Press

CASCA Fellows

Pamela Downe
Udo Krautwurst
Donna Patrick

Outstanding Graduating Anthropology Student Awards

Bachelor’s Award

  • Bronwyn Lee, Dalhousie University
  • Maia Kima, Kwantlen Polytechnic University
  • Emily Henry, St. Francis Xavier University
  • Laurence Martin, Université de Montréal
  • Andréane Chabot, Université Laval
  • Autumn Perry, University of Guelph
  • Amara Wristen, University of Saskatchewan
  • Maddalena Jacobson, University of Winnipeg
  • Sydney Dawson, Western University
  • Mika Billie Hjorngaard Ferentzy, York University
  • Rachel Stewart-Dziama, University of Victoria
  • Kendall Sneyd, University of Toronto – St. George
  • Sonja Tilroe, Mount Royal University
  • Manda Craig, University of Toronto – Mississauga
  • Prisha Vaidya, University of British Columbia, Okanagan
  • Meghna Vijai, University of British Columbia
  • Saskia  McKay, Carleton University

Master’s Awards

  • Briana  Kelly, Dalhousie University
  • Catherine Villeneuve, Université de Montréal
  • Charles-Antoine Lesage, Université Laval
  • Victoria Clowater, University of Guelph
  • Marley Duckett, University of Saskatchewan
  • Kathleen Downie, York University
  • Dylan Hillis, University of Victoria
  • Tiina Maripuu, University of Toronto – St. George
  • Kelly Panchyshyn, University of British Columbia, Okanagan
  • Basant Ahmed Sayed, University of British Columbia
  • Leo Ruhl, Simon Fraser University
  • Carmen West, Carleton University

PhD Awards

  • Katie MacLeod, Dalhousie University
  • Marianne-Sarah Saulnier, Université de Montréal
  • Sarah Bourdages Duclot, Université de Montréal
  • Meredith Evans, York University
  • Tommy Happynook, University of Victoria
  • Erika Finestone, University of Toronto – St. George
  • Frida Lona-Durazo, University of Toronto – Mississauga
  • Lindsay Harris, University of British Columbia, Okanagan
  • Emma  Feltes, University of British Columbia, Okanagan
  • Megan Muller da Silva, Carleton University

Weaver-Tremblay Award

Jasmin Habib

Salisbury Award

Amanda Foote

2020-21

CASCA Awards for Teaching Excellence (CATE)

Instructor

Amirpouyan Shiva

Faculty

Louise de la Gorgendière

The Labrecque-Lee Book Prize

2021

Dr. Hannah Turner, assistant professor at the University of British Columbia School of Information (iSchool)

Cataloging Culture: Legacies of Colonialism in Museum Documentation. UBC Press

2020

Greg Beckett, Professor of Anthropology, Western University, Ontario

There is no more Haiti; Between Life and Death in Port-au-Prince. University of California Press

Wendy Wickwire, Professor Emerita, Department of History, University of Victoria 

At the Bridge; James Teit and an Anthropology of Belonging, University of British Columbia Press

CASCA Fellows

2020

Dan Jorgensen
James Waldram
Christine Jourdan
Marie France Labrecque

2021

Julia Harrison
Noel Dyck
Vered Amit
Sylvie Poirier

Outstanding Graduating Anthropology Student Awards

Bachelor’s Award

  • Robert Hanks, MacEwan University
  • Laurence Alain, Université Laval
  • Jessica Jack, University of Saskatchewan
  • Miguel Priolo Marin, University of Alberta
  • Morgan Herbert, Dalhousie University
  • Karlie Tessmer, Simon Fraser University
  • Joanne Scofield, University of British Columbia, Okanagan
  • Faelan Quinn, Carleton University
  • Daniel Chiu Castillo, McGill University
  • James Binks, University of British Columbia
  • Lorri  Lyster, Athabasca University
  • Brittany Millis, Mount Royal University
  • Jamieson Zunti, Mount Royal University
  • Sydney Kanigan-Taylor, University of Saskatchewan

Master’s Awards

  • Panchala Weerasinghe, University of Waterloo
  • Jean-Daniel Vachon, Université Laval
  • Samantha Moore, University of Saskatchewan
  • Ivan Shmatko, University of Alberta
  • Stephanie Peel, Dalhousie University
  • Sheridan Conty, Carleton University
  • Katrin Schmid, University of British Columbia
  • Divyanjal Puvimanasinghe, York University

PhD Awards

  • Sylvie Bodineau, Université Laval
  • Mirjana Uzelac, University of Alberta
  • Heather Robertson, University of British Columbia

Weaver-Tremblay Award

Bruce Granville Miller

Salisbury Award

2021

Madelyn Prevost

2020

Nicolas Rasiulis

2019

The Labrecque-Lee Book Prize

Katie Kilroy-Marac, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, University of Toronto Scarborough 

An Impossible Inheritance: Postcolonial Psychiatry and the Work of Memory in a West African Clinic. University of California Press

CASCA Fellows

Janice Graham
Alan Smart
Josephine Smart

Outstanding Graduating Anthropology Student Awards

Bachelor’s Awards

  • Ashley Megan Williams, Athabasca University
  • Sara Hormozinejad, University of Calgary
  • Monica Regan, St. Francis Xavier University
  • Angela Murray, University of Saskatchewan
  • Ileanna Cheladyn, Simon Fraser University
  • Marly Hill, Nipissing University
  • Jordanna Marshall, University of British Columbia-Okanagan
  • Benjamin Malo, Universié Laval
  • Zoe Slusar, Mount Royal University
  • Jamie Fairbairn, University of Lethbridge
  • Katherine Lütz, Saint Mary’s University
  • Rehan Sayeed, University of Victoria
  •  Briana Kelly, Dalhousie University
  •  Rajdeep Dhadwal, University of British Columbia
  •  Ciara Farmer, University of Alberta

Master’s Awards

  • Megan Beth Sampson,  University of Calgary
  • Kelsey Marr, University of Saskatchewan
  • Natali Euale, University of Guelph
  • Raphaël Preux, Université de Montréal
  • Jordan Hodgins, York University
  • Clara MacDonald, University of Toronto
  • Carolyne Bolduc, Université Laval
  • Bradley Clements, University of Victoria
  • Erin Hanson, University of British Columbia
  • Julian Kapfumvuti, Memorial University of Newfoundland
  • Tiffany Campbell, University of Alberta

PhD Awards

  • Nicole McFadyen, York University
  • Eva-Marie Kovacs, University of British Columbia-Okanagan
  • Anne-Sophie Deleuze, Université Laval
  • Karoline Guelke, University of Victoria
  • Tonya Canning, Dalhousie University
  • Gregory Gan, University of British Columbia
  • Samantha Breslin, Memorial University of Newfoundland
  • Jennifer Miller, University of Alberta

Weaver-Tremblay Award

Image of Noel Dyck

Noel Dyck’s journey to anthropology began when, as a master’s student in history at the University of Saskatchewan, he conducted archival research on the impacts of the disappearance of the buffalo on the peoples of the Canadian Prairies in the late 1870s. Out of that devastating transition came a mode of federal administration that reduced First Nations from treaty partners to captives of the state. Seeking to move beyond archival sources and into more contemporary developments, Dyck studied social anthropology at the University of Manchester. His doctoral research focused on the opposition of First Nations to the Canadian government’s post-1969 policies and tactics to extricate itself from any responsibility for meeting the needs of First Nations members who had been denied basic civil rights and the freedom to decide their futures for a century. In this research and that which followed after Dyck began teaching anthropology at Simon Fraser University, he enjoyed the privilege of working with band councils, tribal councils, and a provincial First Nations association. Out of this emerged his analysis of “coercive tutelage,” whereby a system of restraint or guardianship is imposed by one party upon another based on the alleged incapacity of the latter to determine his or her own best interests. In addition to writing about government policy with respect to Indigenous peoples in Canada and internationally, Dyck also conducted and published a study of the history of Indian residential schooling for the Prince Albert Grand Council of First Nations.

Dyck’s fascination with formal and informal policies that mediate social and political contexts where identities and lives are worked out also led him to identify a rather different social field within which tutelage is, nonetheless, well-ensconced and can be coercive. What caught his attention is how urban and suburban community sport organizations for children and youths seek to reconcile the provision of fun, fitness, and competitive opportunities to boys and girls with the use of these activities to support the child-rearing responsibilities of many Canadian parents. Indeed, community sports are a locus for intersecting interests that reach beyond local families and playing fields to provincial and national sport organizations, government agencies at all levels, and commercial and corporate interests keen to shape the direction of this popular and increasingly lucrative sector. The power of ethnography to illuminate complex issues has been essential to his work on sport and Indigenous-state relations and to his ongoing teaching in both anthropology and urban studies.

Salisbury Award

Abra Wenzel – PDF / FR

2018

CASCA Fellows

Gilles Bibeau
Jean-Guy Goulet
Winnie Lem, Deirdre Meintel
Gavin Smith

Outstanding Graduating Anthropology Student Awards

Bachelor’s Awards

  • Mary Scott, Carleton University
  • Alastair Parsons, Dalhousie University
  • Cynthia Fasola, University of Calgary
  • Haley Duke, University of Victoria
  • Andrew Van Vliet, Memorial University
  • Kyla Cangiano, Nipissing University
  • Keyna Young, MacEwan University
  • Zoé Fortier University of Saskatchewan
  • Alison Armstrong, St. Francis Xavier University
  • Jordan Daniels, University of Guelph
  • Marwa Turabi, University of Toronto Scarborough
  • Sarah Best, Wilfrid Laurier University
  • Camile Moreau, Université Laval
  • Ana Speranza, York University
  • Riley Edmonds, University of Alberta
  • Brittany Tuffs, University of British Columbia
  • Skylar Caldwell, Mount Royal University

Master’s Awards

  • Sandy Vandervalk, Carleton University
  • Patrick Lee, University of Calgary
  • Ursula Abramczyk, University of Victoria
  • Léane Tremblay, Université Laval
  • Janita Van Dyk, York University
  • Justine Correia, Dalhousie University
  • Xavier Robillard-Martel, Université de Montréal
  • Courtney Lakevold, University of Alberta
  • Emily Leischner, University of British Columbia

PhD Awards

  • Cheryl Matthew, Carleton University
  • Jennifer Robinson, University of Victoria
  • Benoit Éthier, Université Laval
  • Wangui Kimari, York University
  • Catherine Bryan, Dalhousie University
  • Marie-Ève Paré, Université de Montréal
  • Frank Masele, University of Alberta
  • Oralia Gómez-Ramírez, University of British Columbia

Weaver-Tremblay Award

Dr. Dara Culhane received her B.A. in Sociology and Anthropology in 1985 and her Ph.D. in Anthropology in 1994 from Simon Fraser University. Her early work concentrated on historical and contemporary relations between Indigenous peoples and the Canadian Nation State. She worked with Northwest Coast First Nations in British Columbia documenting oral histories, family stories, archival and legal research surrounding land rights and sovereignty, cultural practices, ceremony and performance, and everyday contemporary life. For two years (1992-1994), she served as Deputy Director for Social and Cultural Research with the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples, where she coordinated the Residential School Study, and The RCAP Life History Project. Since 1994, she has been teaching Anthropology at Simon Fraser University.

Dr. Culhane’s more recent work has focused on developing experimental ethnographic research methodologies, and interdisciplinary collaborations with artists and artist/scholars, exploring ways of communicating research beyond the academy to diverse audiences through popular writing, exhibits, installations and live performance. Culhane has undertaken professional training in voice and oral/aural performance, and in 2017 earned certification as an assistant teacher of Fitzmaurice Voicework. She has written and performed a work of dramatic storytelling entitled Hear Me Looking At You in Canada, Ireland and the United States, and more local and international performances are planned. Culhane is Co-Founder and Co-Curator of the Centre for Imaginative Ethnography, a transnational cyber collective with over 70 members.

Dara Culhane’s current work is located where ethnography, writing, performance, and imagination mingle. She has four new projects in progress. Encore! Travels With The Ghost of Margaret Sheehy is a multi-genre text that tells stories about an unconventional actress and elocutionist who lived in Dublin and Montreal during the first half of the twentieth century. Complicity! Sex, Drugs and Research combines a play, novella, and cabaret and is set in Downtown Eastside Vancouver during the years 2000-2010. Monologues For Moments of Danger is a series of oral/aural live performances/podcasts that draw on memory-work and autoethnography and that have been performed at national and international professional conferences and performance events. Lastly, Playing With Worlds is an experimental ethnographic film, an interdisciplinary collaboration in development.

Salisbury Award

Justin Raycraft – PDF / EN

2017

CASCA Fellows

Pauline Gardiner Barber
Andrew Lyons
Harriet Lyons
Bruce Miller

Outstanding Graduating Anthropology Student Awards

Honours Awards

  • Jake Vinje, University of Lethbridge
  • Sarah England, Dalhousie University
  • Annabelle Fouquet, Université Laval
  • Thulasi Kandiah, McMaster University
  • Kelsey Mackenzie, Mount Royal University
  • Jessica Hinton, University of New Brunswick
  • Anna Lorraine Thompson, University of Victoria
  • Kristin Leis, University of Waterloo
  • Frankie Di Renzo, Carleton University
  • Jenna Locke, Saint Mary’s University
  • Rebecca Marie Nokleby, University of Alberta
  • Caitlin Stonham, University of British Columbia
  • Nicole Davies, McGill University
  • Carly Piatocha, University of Northern British Columbia

Master’s Awards

  • Chloe Westlake, Dalhousie University
  • Olivia Roy-Malo, Université Laval
  • Diana El Richani, University of Ottawa
  • Carson Rehn, University of New Brunswick
  • Melanie Callas, University of Victoria
  • Erin Van Der Meulen, University of Waterloo
  • Stephanie Mayell, McMaster University
  • Justin Langille, Carleton University
  • Faun Ember Rice, University of Alberta
  • Kendra Jewell, University of British Columbia
  • Callan Ross-Sheppard, McGill University

PhD Awards

  • Carolina Tytelman, Memorial University
  • Isabelle Auclair, Université Laval
  • Celeste Pedri, University of Victoria
  • Lauren Wallace, McMaster University
  • Matthew Hawkins, University of Alberta
  • Clayton Whitt, University of British Columbia
  • Katherine Sinclair, McGill University
  • Logan Cochrane, University of British Columbia

Weaver-Tremblay Award

Margaret Critchlow (award 2017), PhD, was Professor of Social Anthropology at York University in Toronto for 25 years before moving to BC and taking early retirement in 2010. She is past-president of the Canadian Anthropology Society. Her fieldwork in the SW Pacific islands of Vanuatu and in Canadian rental housing co-ops has resulted in over 50 academic articles and 7 books on land tenure, development, and housing issues. She has always enjoyed collaborating with others including co-editing, and co-authoring. In 2007, she was one of four co-editors of House-girls Remember: Domestic Workers in Vanuatu. Upon retiring to Sooke, BC, Margaret helped create Harbourside Cohousing, the first senior cohousing community in BC. She is also the founding director of the non-profit Canadian Senior Cohousing Society.

Salisbury Award

Jing Jing Liu – PDF / EN

2016

Founding Fellows

Ellen Judd (University of Manitoba)
Francine Saillant (Université Laval)

Weaver-Tremblay Award

Janice Elizabeth Graham‘s career in applied anthropology in Canada began as an undergraduate, where her most influential professor was the late Sally Weaver. Like Sally, she has spent much of her career “studying up” as Lara Nader put it, after beginning her work among marginalized people. Sally Weaver’s early fieldwork was with First Nations (Medicine & Politics Among the Grand River Iroquois)-which led her along the path that culminated in her award winning Making Indian Policy, which was based on fieldwork with federal bureaucrats. The path Janice has taken is similar: she began by doing fieldwork where medicine and actual daily lives of vulnerable elderly people meet. Her Master’s thesis at Victoria was one of the first ethnographies in Canada conducted in a senior’s home: Friendship and Despair: Social Relations in a Long Term Care Facility in Victoria. She followed that path through her doctorate at U. de Montreal where she focused on how dementia is diagnosed, Diagnosing Dementia: Signs, Symptoms and Meaning. This led her along the path that eventually saw her conducting research, in Ottawa, on the hidden process of drug trials and certification at Health Canada, where illness, politics and profits are woven into the production of an economy of treatment-sometimes at the expense of the very people it is intended to help. Much of this work was conducted while Dr. Graham was a professor ofBioethics at Dalhousie, in the Faculty of Medicine, cross-appointed to Sociology and Anthropology.

Dr Graham’s research and publication into areas in critical cultural gerontology continues, with papers and chapters (and a book, Contesting Aging and Loss-Graham and Stephenson) which deal with the ethical issues attached to research with persons with dementia, from the ethnographic to drug trials. However, she expanded her work almost a decade ago to examine aging across the life-span and now also works on the ethical issues and economies of vaccine testing and production among some of the poorest populations in the world, most particularly children in Burkina Faso. The economics of clinical trials for vaccines has meant that they have been exported to countries where they can be conducted ‘expeditiously’-at least from the perspective of large pharmaceutical manufacturers. As Dr Graham’s critically engaged work has shown, the vaccines tested may not necessarily be those most needed at the site where the trials are run. Their market lies elsewhere. Dr Graham is currently Professor, Department of Pediatrics (Infectious Diseases), Faculty of Medicine, Dalhousie University. She is also associate director of the Canadian Center for Vaccinology. At Dalhousie, Dr. Graham has been a Canada Research Chair, the Scientific Director of the Technoscience and Regulation Research Unit, and founder and Director of the unique Qualitative Research Commons and Studio (QuRCS). She has also received many speaking distinctions throughout Canada, and has been widely recognized in Europe and the United States. She has been a visiting Professor, Maladies Infectieuses et Vecteurs Ecologie, Genetique, Evolution et Controle (MIVEGEC), CNRS Centre IRD de Montpellier, France; visiting Senior Fellow, BIOS Centre for the Study of Bioscience, Biomedicine, Biotechnology and Society, London School of Economics and Political Science, and visiting Scholar, Meningitis Vaccine Project (MVP), PATH-Europe, Ferney-Voltaire, in France, among others.

Salisbury Award

Evan Koike – PDF / EN

2015

Founding Fellows

Pierre Beaucage (Emeritus Université de Montréal)
Julie Cruikshank (Emerita UBC)
Carmen Lambert (Emerita McGill)
Pierre Maranda (Emeritus Université Laval)
Eric Schwimmer (Emeritus, Université Laval)

Weaver-Tremblay Award

Marie-France Labrecque earned her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in anthropology from Université Laval before completing a doctorate in social and cultural anthropology at City University of New York in 1982. She was a Professor with the Université Laval Department of Anthropology for more than 30 years, earning the title of Emeritus Professor in 2012. Her many initiatives in the field were concentrated in Mexico as well as the Andes. Dr. Labrecque’s research initially focused on the class struggles of the Mexican peasantry from a historical materialistic standpoint. Subsequently, her focus shifted to the conditions of peasant and indigenous women, adopting a feminist political economy approach. This research—which continually strived to promote student training in the field—led her to specialize in criticism of international development, particularly in connection with the Gender and Development approach. This specialization in turn prompted her to take part in applied interdisciplinary studies leveraging participatory approaches to examine maternal and child health (in Peru), agriculture and livestock production (in Colombia), and food security (in Mali).

The whole of her academic work over the past 30 years has investigated what might be described as approaches to mobility, whether in terms of ideas (as in the case of international guidelines for integrating women into development or gender mainstreaming), capital and goods (as in the case of indigenous women’s labour in subcontracting factories, i.e., maquiladora plants), or people (as in the case of migration).

Her current research centres on crosscutting North-South dynamics, whether by comparing femicides in Mexico and in Canada or by studying Mayan temporary farm workers from the Yucatan who migrate to Canada on a seasonal basis to work in the agricultural sector. Although retired, she continues to pursue her research activities, working from an activist and feminist perspective. Dr. Labrecque is a prominent member of the international community of Mexicanists and Americanists and has been a visiting professor at numerous universities.

Salisbury Award

Deidre Cullen – PDF / EN

2014

Founding Fellows

Jim Freedman
Gerald Gold
Frances Henry
Andrea Laforet
Richard Lee
Richard Preston
Donat Savoie
Margaret Seguin Anderson
Gerald Sider

Weaver-Tremblay Award

Regna Darnell (award 2014) is Distinguished University Professor in Anthropology
First Nations Studies at Western University. She was the
recipient of the Boas Award for Exemplary Service to Anthropology
in 2005, the American Anthropology Association’s highest honour.
She is a member of the American Philosophical Society, received a Doctor of Letters Degree from The University of Waterloo in 2009 and is a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. In 2007-2008, she served as President of the Canadian Anthropology Society.
Professor Darnell has mentored many anthropology students and First Nations scholars, and is the founding director of Western University’s First Nations Studies Program. Through applied, collaborative research and teaching, she has made a significant contribution to the retention, revitalization and preservation of
First Nations languages in Canada. She has carried out research in Northern Alberta, British Columbia, Saskatchewan, West Africa, and Southern Ontario into language, Indigenous knowledge and traditional medicines, identity, mobility and social change, the risk of contaminants on First Nations, water and ecosystems health.
Her extensive archival work has explored the history of
anthropology in North America. She has published widely on First Nations languages and cultures, as well as Edward Sapir, Franz Boas, and anthropological theory and linguistics in the United States and Canada.

Salisbury Award

Letha Victor – PDF / EN

2013

Founding Fellows

Michael Asch
Margaret Critchlow
Regna Darnell
Harvey Feit
Marie-Françoise Guédon
Robin Ridington
Peter Stephenson
Adrian Tanner
Penny van Esterik
Elvi Whitaker

Weaver-Tremblay Award

Adrian Tanner was born in the UK and came to Canada as a young farm worker. He went on to work on weather stations in the arctic, where he gained some familiarity with Inuit hunters. He attended UBC, where he conducted research with Yukon Indigenous  peoples and communities, and McGill, where he was introduced to the Quebec Cree, before gaining a Ph.D. from the University of Toronto. He has been with the Anthropology Department at Memorial University since 1972, where he is now Honorary Research Professor. His current research interests are with the Indigenous peoples of Quebec, Labrador and northern Ontario, on such topics as social suffering, community healing, Indigenous rights, forestry, land tenure, hunting, politics, and the documentation of local knowledge. He has also conducted research outside Canada, especially on the people of the Colo Navosa region of Vitilevu, Fiji.

Salisbury Award

Karine Gagné – PDF / EN

2012

Salisbury Award

Joshua Lalor – PDF / EN

2011

Weaver-Tremblay Award

Dr. Pamela Downe (award 2011) is one of the most highly regarded Canadian scholars in the broad areas of violence in the lives of girls and young women, HIV/AIDS, and motherhood and one of the few scholars in Canada to examine the challenges faced by girls who have been involved in the sex trade.

Professor Downe’s work has been used to inform the development of policies and programs designed to meet the needs of this population. Professor Downe possesses all the best characteristics of a caring and committed scholar whose thinking is, at once, fierce, focused, and courageous.

Dr Downe has crafted sophisticated theoretical analyses and innovative methodological strategies in research that addresses a range of key issues including: discourses of disease in relation to social contexts; theorizing the shifting terrain of motherhood; the sexual exploitation and trafficking of women and girls; girls and prostitution; migration and health; addictions and drug use; harm reduction; public health and health policy and, more recently, maternal health and HIV/AIDS. Dr. Downe’s complex framing of health and well-being has been her signature contribution not only to medical anthropology but to women?s and gender studies as well.

As a feminist scholar and activist, Dr. Downe has made an important contribution to the scholarship examining questions of power and the politics of health for womens and girls lives in postcolonial, transnational and global contexts.

Professor Downe has shaped her professional trajectory according to the pressing needs of marginalized groups and people for whom she has sought practical solutions with to ameliorate the suffering in their lives and to fight against social inequities within Canada, the Caribbean and Central America.

Dr. Downe’s role on the CASCA Exec has been featured in this University of Saskatchewan news article.

2010

Weaver-Tremblay Award

Gilles Bibeau

Salisbury Award

Sébastien Després – PDF / EN

2009

Weaver-Tremblay Award

Professor James B. Waldram is Chair of the Cultural Anthropology Program, College or Arts and Science, and Coordinator, Culture and Human Development Program, Dept of Psychology, at the University of Saskatchewan.

Jim was mentored by the distinguished anthropologist Sally Weaver. After attaining a Master’s degree from the University of Manitoba, Jim went to the University of Connecticut, earning a doctorate from the renowned applied medical anthropologists Gretta and Pertti Pelto. Jim has been on faculty at the University of Saskatchewan since 1983, where, in the early years, he established Saskatchewan’s first Department of Native Studies. He wrote the proposal for the graduate program and supervised its first students. Jim served as Chair of the Graduate Program for over a decade, while simultaneously holding the position of Department Head. He was instrumental in promoting the hiring of indigenous people in the Native Studies department at the University of Saskatchewan, a move taken for granted now, but novel at the time.

Most recently, he has served as the Chair of the Culture and Human Development graduate program in Psychology while assuming the position of Chair of the revitalized Anthropology program, where, over the last year, he has redesigned the entire undergraduate program and has started work on a new graduate program proposal as part of the College’s efforts to revitalize Anthropology at the University of Saskatchewan.

He co-founded and was Associate Editor of theNative Studies Review, 1985-98. From his undergraduate career at Waterloo, through to chairing the Standing Committee on Social Issues and Anthropological Responsibility at the Society for Applied Anthropology meetings in Saskatchewan in 1988, to 2004 when, as President of the Canadian Anthropology Society (CASCA) he assisted in framing the charter of the World Council of Anthropological Associations, Jim has set his standards and goals high and achieves each one. He is currently the International Delegate for CASCA to the World Council of Anthropological Associations, and also serves as an advisory board member for WCAA. Nationally, he is a founding board member for the National Network for Aboriginal Mental Health Research.

Some of his publications: Aboriginal health in Canada: Historical, cultural and epidemiological perspectives (2006) [1995], Revenge of the Windigo:the construction of the mind and mental health  of North American Aboriginal peoples (2004), The Way of the Pipe: Aboriginal spirituality and symbolic healing in Canadian prisons (1996), Aboriginal healing in Canada: Studies in therapeutic meaning and practice (2008).

Jim’s work has received national acknowledgement with numerous honours, including the Harold Adams Innes Book award. In 2005, he was namedChampion of Mental Health Research and Advocacyby the Canadian Alliance on Mental Illness and Mental Health (CAMIMH) representing eighteen mental health organizations from across Canada, for his work in understanding Aboriginal mental health.

Never one to sit back, Jim has most recently had his head turned by Mayan healers in Central America.

Salisbury Award

Carly A. Dokis – PDF / FR

2008

Weaver-Tremblay Award

Harvey Feit

Salisbury Award

Rita Isabel Henderson – PDF / EN

2007

Salisbury Award

Christine Schreyer – PDF / FR

2006

Salisbury Award

Marie-Claude Haince – PDF / FR

2005

Salisbury Award

Christianne Stephenson – PDF / FR

2004

Salisbury Award

Annik Chiron de La Casinière – PDF / FR

2003

Salisbury Award

Elizabeth Finnis – PDF / EN

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